Tiny House
More About The National Coalition for Dialogue & Deliberation • Join Now!
Community News

Nomination Process Open for 2016 Brown Democracy Medal

As we look toward 2016, we want to encourage our members to consider submitting a nomination for the 2016 Brown Democracy Medal for Innovations in Democratic Practice.  The Medal and a $5,000 award are awarded annually by the McCourtney Institute for Democracy – one of our NCDD organizational members.

The award is Mccourtney Institute Logodesigned to bring attention to work that is “important to democracy but under-appreciated” – something that we know describes a lot of people in D&D. In fact, the 2014 Medal was awarded to NCDD member organization the Participatory Budgeting Project, so we have high hopes for 2016!

The nomination process is open now, and all initial inquiries are due by February 1, 2016. We encourage you to nominate people, projects, or organizations that you think are innovating in the way we do democracy. Here are some of the guidelines for nominations:

Review Criteria

The democratic innovation selected will score highest on these features:

  1. Novelty. The innovation is precisely that – a genuinely new way of thinking about democracy or practicing it. The award is thus intended to recognize recent accomplishments, which have occurred during the previous five years. The innovation will likely build on or draw on past ideas and practices, but its novelty must be obvious.
  2. Systemic change. The idea, theory, or practical reform should represent significant change in how we think about and practice democracy. Ideas should be of the highest clarity and quality, empirical studies should be rigorous and grounded in evidence, and practical reforms must have proof of their effectiveness. The change the innovation brings about should be able to alter the larger functioning of a democratic system over a long time frame.
  3. Potential for Diffusion. The idea or reform should have general applicability across many different scales and cultural contexts. In other words, it should be relevant to people who aspire to democracy in many parts of the world and/or in many different social or political settings.
  4. Democratic Quality. In practical terms, while the nominees themselves may well be partisan, the spirit of this innovation must be nonpartisan and advance the most essential qualities of democracy, such as broad social inclusion, deliberativeness, political equality, and effective self-governance.

When choosing among otherwise equally qualified submissions, the review panel will also consider two practical questions. Who would give the lecture on campus and meet with the PSU community? Who would write the essay about the innovation? Neither needs to be the nominee, nor the nominator.

Initial nomination inquiries should be sent in the form a one-to-two page letter that describes how the nominee’s work meets the criteria for this award and what distinguishes it from other work on democracy. Both self-nominations and nominations of others are welcomed. In either case, email, phone, and postal contact information for the nominee must be included.

For more information on the nomination process, please visit http://democracyinstitute.la.psu.edu/awards/seeking-nominations-for-the-2016-penn-state-democracy-medal.

Good luck to all the nominees!

Roshan Bliss on LinkedinRoshan Bliss on Twitter
Roshan Bliss
An inclusiveness trainer and group process facilitator, Roshan Bliss serves as NCDD's Youth Engagement Coordinator and Blog Curator. Combining his belief that decisions are better when everyone is involved with his passion for empowering young people, his work focuses on increasing the involvement of youth and students in public conversations.

  More Posts  

Post Your Comment!

 

-