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From the CommunityFrom the Community

Do Something Invites 2006 Brick Award Applications

Each year Do Something (www.dosomething.org), a national not-for-profit organization honors six outstanding leaders age 18 and under and three outstanding leaders between the ages of 19 and 25 who take action that measurably strengthens their communities in the areas of community building, health, or the environment. Each of the 18 and under winners is awarded a $5,000 higher education scholarship and a $5,000 community grant, to be directed by the award winner to the not-for-profit organization of his or her choice. Winners in the 19 to 25 category each receive a $10,000 community grant. All winners receive pro bono services, and all winners attend the annual Brick Awards Gala event in New York City, where their accomplishments will be celebrated. In addition, Do Something works closely with Brick winners to generate local and national media coverage of their work, and to spotlight what young people can achieve. Applications are due November 1, 2005. Apply online for a Brick Award at www.dosomething.org/awards/brick/.

From the CommunityFrom the Community

"Potlucks for Peace" Promote Dialogue About Middle East

We just heard from Libby and Len Traubman about one person who is making a big difference to dialogue on the Middle East in Ottawa, Canada. Qais Ghanem (Ghanems@rogers.com) is a Yemeni-born professor of medicine at the University of Ottawa. He was inspired to start “Potlucks for Peace” after attending a panel on the Middle East that quickly descended into a shouting match. Seeking to promote civil dialogue on the issues, he extended his hands (and his living room!) to both Arabs and Jews in Ottawa, the capital of Canada in early 2003. Today in Spring 2005, “Potlucks for Peace” — 60 women and men — continue to recruit new Arab and Jewish members. Many of the participants had had little or no contact with members of the other group before coming to their first meeting. Visit the Potlucks for Peace website for more information on this group www.potlucksforpeace.org.

From the CommunityFrom the Community

New Interactive Feature on the Harwood Institute Website

We just heard about an interesting experiment being run by the Harwood Institute for Public Innovation (www.theharwoodinstitute.org). Richard C. Harwood, President and Founder of The Harwood Institute has often claimed, “When I’m talking with a group of citizens, and I close my eyes and listen, I find it impossible to tell whether the person speaking is a Republican or a Democrat, where they live, or what socioeconomic class they belong to.” A new interactive feature on The Harwood Institute’s website puts this claim to the test. Take a look at quotes from recently conducted focus groups, one in a heavily Republican suburban district, and one in an urban Democratic stronghold, and see if you can tell Red from Blue. Click here to try it out!

From the CommunityFrom the Community

New Information on Collaborative Policy Available Online

The Center for Collaborative Policy has a new e-newsletter out. A quarterly publication, The Collaborative Edge covers all kinds of issues related to collaborative policy making, and invites submissions to the newsletter from anyone working in this area. To subscribe, email their subscription manager (jmonaghan@ccp.csus.edu) with the text “subscribe” or “unsubscribe” in the heading or body of your message. Newsletter archives are available online at http://www.csus.edu/ccp/newsletter/archives/index.htm. And click on the link below for a summary of the Spring/Summer 2005 issue.

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From the CommunityFrom the Community

Agape Foundation Invites Nominations for First Annual Peace Prize

The San Francisco-based Agape Foundation (www.agapefn.org) is a nonprofit public foundation that raises and distributes funds to nonviolent social change organizations committed to peace and justice issues. To that end, the foundation has established the Agape Peace Prizes in order to bring recognition to Northern California peacemakers, organizations, and individuals. The Long Haul Prize honors a Northern California peace- maker who has made a sustained effort to create peace in their community, nationally, or internationally. The Rising Peacemaker Prize recognizes a peacemaker making a critical difference who has been working for peace for five years or less. Winners will receive a $500 cash prize and capacity building assistance from Bay Area experts and trainers. Nominations are due by June 25. For more details and a nomination form, visit the Agape Foundation website: http://www.agapefn.org/ppnom/ppform.html.

From the CommunityFrom the Community

New PBS Documentary Spotlights Democracy and Polarization

We just heard about a fascinating new documentary airing on PBS on July 12 from Pamela Calvert at The Working Group (www.theworkinggroup.org). THE FIRE NEXT TIME follows a deeply divided group of Montana citizens caught in intractable conflicts intensified by rapid growth, scapegoating, and the power of talk radio. The hour-long documentary reflects on critical issues in the United States today: the high stakes in the battle over development and the environment, the breakdown of civil discourse and the growth of “red-blue” polarization, and the role of extremist media in spreading intolerance. It premieres nationally on the PBS series P.O.V on July 12 at 10 pm. If you’re interested in using THE FIRE NEXT TIME to initiate dialogue in your community, contact Pamela at (510) 268-9675 x310 or pcalvert@theworkinggroup.org

From the CommunityFrom the Community

New Tools for Evaluating Racial Equity Programs Now Available On the Web

The Center for Assessment and Policy Development and MP Associates, Inc., has just launched “Evaluation Tools for Racial Equity” (www.evaluationtoolsforracialequity.org), a new web site that offers resources and advice on evaluating a program’s effectiveness in bridging racial divides. The site includes all kinds of tools and resources on how to organize and carry out an evaluation, what kinds of questions to ask and outcomes to measure, and also some guidelines for thinking about and using results.

From the CommunityFrom the Community

SCRC and League of Women Voters Organizes National Discussion on Civil Liberties and Homeland Security

With Congress preparing to debate provisions of the PATRIOT Act this fall, many people are thinking about what they can do locally to strike a balance between civil liberties and homeland security. To aid in the process, the Study Circles Resource Center and the League of Women Voters Education Fund are launching a national initiative this month called Local Voices: Citizen Conversations on Civil Liberties and Secure Communities. The three-part discussion series gives everyday people a chance to talk about ways they can keep their community safe while protecting people’s individual rights. For more information, contact SCRC at 860-928-2616 or visit www.studycircles.org.

From the CommunityFrom the Community

News From the Sustained Dialogue Campus Network

The Sustained Dialogue Campus Network (www.sustaineddialogue.org) is a network of 16 colleges and universities across the nation focusing on communication that addresses deep-seated social issues such as racism, religion, sexual orientation, and class. In addition to on-campus activities, the SDCN recently organized its 2nd National Conference that took place April 9-10, attracting about 130 students and administrators from 18 colleges and high schools around the country. By all accounts, the conference was a great success, generating much networking and problem-solving. The SDCN also produces a monthly newsletter about its activities – to subscribe to the newsleter email institute@sustaineddialogue.org. For a preview of the May/June newsletter, click on the link below.
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From the CommunityFrom the Community

New Information Society Law and Policy Journal Available Online

We just heard about the launch of the new journal I/S: A Journal of Law and Policy for the Information Society. I/S is an interdisciplinary journal of research and commentary concentrating on the intersection of law, policy, and information technology. The first issue features a symposium on electronic rule-making, book reviews and an article on HIV/AIDS, Information and Communication in Africa. The journal is jointly produced by Carnegie Mellon’s InSITeS and the Center for Interdisciplinary Law and Policy Studies at The Ohio State University’s Moritz College of Law. Paper copies will be available in a few weeks, but you can check out their inaugural issue online at http://www.is-journal.org. Questions and comments about I/S can be sent to its managing editor, Sol Bermann, at bermann.1@osu.edu.

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