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Participatory Practices…

Over 180 tools and methods used for dialogue and deliberation are listed here. About 50 of the resources in this category originated in Coastal CRC’s Citizen Science Toolbox, and were edited and expanded upon (with permission) in an NCDD wiki.

Citizen Reflective Council

The concept "citizen reflective councils" is emerging through our deeper study of the concept Citizen Deliberative Council. In most materials at www.co-intelligence.org - and in the book The Tao of Democracy - we've used the term "Citizen Deliberative Council to embrace a set of democratic innovations that we now believe may need to be reconceptualized. (continue)

Citizens Jury Process

The Citizens Jury process is a method for gathering a microcosm of the public, having them attend five days of hearings, deliberate among themselves and then issue findings and recommendations on the issue they have discussed. No deliberative method has been more carefully designed or thoroughly tested than this method. (continue)

Citizens’ Panels

A Citizens' Panel is a large, demographically representative group of citizens used to assess public preferences and opinions. Citizens' panels are made up of a representative sample of a local population and are used by statutory agencies, especially local authorities, to identify local issues and consult service users and non-users. Potential participants are generally recruited through random sampling of the electoral roll or door-to-door recruitment. They are then selected so that membership is made up of a representative profile of the local population in terms of age and gender. (continue)

Civic Journalism

Civic journalism sets out to provide people with detailed news and information about specific issues to allow them to make the decisions they are called on to make in a democratic society. Newspapers, radio and television stations, and the internet combine to provide forums for citizens to question their politicians, polling the electorate to elicit the major issues and then questioning legislators. (continue)

Civic Reflection

Civic reflection is the practice of bringing together a group of people who are engaged in common civic work to read and talk about fundamental questions of civic life. This form of dialogue draws upon the rich resources of the humanities--using readings of literature, philosophy, and history, and the age-old practice of text-based discussion--to help civic leaders think more carefully and talk more comfortably about their values and choices. (continue)

CivicEvolution

CivicEvolution is a new technology that helps people develop proposals collaboratively. You can propose an idea and lead a team to develop the idea into a full proposal. Or, you can join a team to help develop a proposal suggested by someone else. The estimated time to complete a proposal in this deliberative, asynchronous environment is three weeks. The proposals that are developed have six sections: an idea, goals, action plan, impacts, first steps, and key research. Proposals are developed as people submit and rate key points for each section of the proposal in order. The key points from the previous section provide the foundation for the next section. (continue)

Civil Dialogue™ at ASU

The term “Civil Dialogue,” as used by colleagues at Arizona State University, refers to a structured format for public dialogue. On their website, at www.civil-dialogue.com, they describe their work as “Using structured, public dialogue to build a bridge across the chasm of polarized viewpoints on hot topics, and to restore civility in public discourse.” The format was created at the Hugh Downs School of Human Communication at Arizona State University and continues to be developed by John Genette, Jennifer Linde, Clark Olson, and other scholars. (continue)

Clean Talk

Clean Talk is a communications model specifically designed for expressing challenging or difficult messages in ways that avoid the triggering of defensive responses. It enables facilitators to speak powerfully in groups while minimizing the possibility of creating a destructive wake of reaction. Clean Talk also opens up trust and allows for more responsibility to be shared in any conversation. Clean Talk was developed by Cliff Barry, founder of Shadow Work Seminars. (continue)

Clearness Committee

The following text by Parker J. Palmer is excerpted from the Center for Courage & Renewal website at www.couragerenewal.org. This group communication method invented by the Quakers in the 1660’s protects individual identity and integrity while drawing on the wisdom of other people. People who wish to make significant use of the Clearness Committee process are urged to read Chapter VIII, “Living the Questions,” in Parker J. Palmer’s A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers, 2009). There you will […] (continue)

Climate Change Dialogue

The climate change issue is a real one. It is now widely accepted that our climate is changing, and the Earth is warming. No one can deny this, since meteorlogical data confirms the last few years are the warmest on record. The only discussion whether this effect is manmade or natural. (continue)

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