Tiny House
More About The National Coalition for Dialogue & Deliberation • Join Now!
Community News

Posts with the Tag “Archon Fung”

These resources and publications were authored in part or in full by Archon Fung, Ford Foundation Professor of Democracy and Citizenship at Harvard Kennedy School.

Challenges to Democracy Public Dialogue Series and Blog

The Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government advances excellence and innovation in governance and public policy through research, education, and public discussion. One of its three major programs is the Program on Democratic Governance, which researches those practices that resolve urgent social problems in developed and developing societies. In honor of its 10th anniversary, the Ash Center launched a public dialogue series named Challenges to Democracy. Through a series of events with scholars, policymakers, journalists, and artists, the […] (continue)

Future Directions for Public Deliberation

This final chapter of The Deliberative Democracy Handbook: Strategies for effective civic engagement in the twenty-first century (pp. 271-288), was published in the Journal for Public Deliberation in 2005. The chapter was co-authored by Peter Levine of the University of Maryland (now at Tufts), Archon Fung of Harvard University’s Kennedy School, and John Gastil of the University of Washington (now at Penn State). This final chapter begins by briefly reviewing the most consistent and encouraging findings across the many different cases reviewed in this volume. Levine, Fung, and Gastil […] (continue)

Democratizing Deliberation: A Political Theory Anthology

The Kettering Foundation’s soon-to-be-released book, Democratizing Deliberation: A Political Theory Anthology, brings together recent and cutting-edge political theory scholarship on deliberative democracy. Edited by Derek Barker, Noelle McAfee, and David McIvor, the collection reframes deliberative democracy to be sensitive to the deep conflicts, multiple forms of communication, and aspirations for civic agency that characterize real public deliberation. In so doing, the book addresses many of the most common challenges to the theory and practice of deliberative democracy. Here’s what NCDD member Katherine Cramer Walsh (University of Wisconsin-Madison) says about the […] (continue)

Connections 2007: A Year’s Review from the Perspective of Citizens

Connections is a yearly periodical published by the Kettering Foundation featuring articles devoted to a theme. Each issue of the foundation’s annual newsletter focuses on a particular area of Kettering’s research and contains articles, feature stories, and book reviews relevant to the foundation’s work. Editing responsibilities for Connections rotate among Kettering program staff. The 2007 edition shares studies related to “democracy as seen from the perspective of communities“.  Below is an excerpt from the introduction… In this issue, you will find background articles, interviews, and studies that flesh out […] (continue)

Connections – Summer 2003: The Public-Government Relationship

Connections is a yearly (previously biannual) periodical published by the Kettering Foundation featuring articles devoted to a theme. Each issue of the foundation’s annual newsletter focuses on a particular area of Kettering’s research and contains articles, feature stories, and book reviews relevant to the foundation’s work. Editing responsibilities for Connections rotate among Kettering program staff. The Summer 2003 edition shares research related to the “relationship between the public and the government“. Below is an excerpt from the introduction… Kettering is now considering new research on ways to bridge the […] (continue)

The Democracy Cube

In his 2006 article titled “Varieties of Participation in Complex Governance” (Public Administration Review, Vol. 66: 66-75), Professor Archon Fung of Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government introduced a broad typology called The Democracy Cube, in which the first axis displays the authority and power of the participants in the process, the second axis shows who participates in the process, and the third axis reveals how decisions are made. (continue)

Using Social Media to Increase Civic Engagement in U.S. Federal Agencies

Published in March 2010 and available for download from SlideShare, the 90-ish page Using Social Media to Increase Civic Engagement in U.S. Federal Agencies is a report for the FCC’s Broadband Taskforce, Civic Engagement Team. Archon Fung was the academic advisor for this paper, which was prepared by two Kennedy School grad students. http://www.slideshare.net/yasminfodil/social-media-and-civic-participation-final Here is the executive summary: Civic engagement is a critical element of our democratic process. It has many potential benefits for public policy professionals, including: creating public value in the form […] (continue)

Sustaining Public Engagement: Embedded Deliberation in Local Communities

Everyday Democracy and the Kettering Foundation published a must-read research report (October 2009) that provides insights on how public engagement activities can grow into a diverse, ongoing practice in communities. The report, Sustaining Public Engagement: Embedded Deliberation in Local Communities, was written by Harvard University researchers Archon Fung and Elena Fagotto. (continue)

How to Hold a Public Meeting

Archon Fung, a professor at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, has written a short article titled “How to Hold a Public Meeting,” published in the March/April 2010 edition of Capitol Ideas, the magazine of the Council of State Governments. Fung’s article can be seen online at www.csg.org/pubs/capitolideas/mar_apr_2010/howto.aspx, and outlines 5 tips for holding an effective public meeting: be clear on the purpose, get help, avoid the usual format, go beyond the usuals, and avoid promises you can’t keep. This is a nice, concise one-pager worth […] (continue)

Deepening Democracy: Institutional Innovations in Empowered Participatory Governance

This 2003 book by Archon Fung and Erik Olin Wright presents case studies which demonstrate how people are inventing new political forms that realize the deeper democratic ideal of government of, by and for the people. The four contemporary cases explore the participatory budgeting process in Porto Alegre; decentralized school councils and community policing groups in Chicago; stakeholder planning in environmental protection and habitat management; and new participatory governance structures in Kerala, India. www.archonfung.net (continue)

-