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Posts with the Tag “civic engagement”

Community Organizations and Social Capital: A Guide to Program Evaluation (Draft)

Freely downloadable from the NCDD website, this guide measures social trust, political participation, civic leadership and associational involvement, giving and volunteering, faith-based involvement, informal social ties, diversity of friendship, and equality of civic engagement. (continue)

Institute for Civic Discourse and Democracy

Kansas State University's ICDD promotes citizen deliberation on tough political and social issues, resulting in increased citizen participation, reflection, communication, and respect. ICDD works to enhance democratization locally, nationally, and internationally through improved community deliberation, facilitation and evaluation practices, development of a certified facilitator training program, and interdisciplinary research on models of civic discourse. (continue)

Mobilize.org

Mobilize.org, formerly Mobilizing America's Youth, is an all-partisan network dedicated to educating, empowering, and energizing young people to increase our civic engagement and political participation. We work to show young people how their lives are impacted by public policy and in turn, how we can impact public policy. (continue)

Embedding Dialogue on a University Campus

Many institutions of higher education use dialogue as a communication tool to engage and involve the campus community itself as well as surrounding communities. This workshop at NCDD's 2006 conference focused on how three institutions have begun to integrate and embed the process of dialogue into university life - and here is where you can find all six handouts from this well-received session. (continue)

Politics for People: Finding a Responsible Public Voice (Second Edition)

Americans make no secret of their disenchantment with the political system. This book is about Americans who are looking for ways to build civic communities and generate the political energy necessary to define and express the public will. This second edition contains compelling new material on the National Issues Forums convened in libraries, churches, prisons, and schools across the country. 275 pages. (continue)

Why Public Schools? Whose Public Schools?

As an outgrowth of the foundation's research in the politics of education, Why Public Schools? Whose Public Schools? explores how communities once acted together to create schools. The setting is frontier Alabama, yet every state has similar stories. By exposing the tightly coupled relationship between communities and their schools, Mathews finds that cooperation and civic involvement are necessary to resolve today's educational crisis. (continue)

Empowering Regions: Strategies and Tools for Community Decision Making

Beyond the excitement that naturally comes from introducing a new technology, the real opportunity is in how regional stewards can use new tools to improve decision making in their communities. Information and civic engagement tools have the potential to change the way we govern ourselves. Regional stewards are leaders committed to the long-term well-being of their regions. As regions grapple with complex issues such as economic development, environmental quality, social equity, and governance reform, regional stewards must help their communities make thoughtful, informed choices about their collective future. (continue)

The Legitimacy of International Governance: A Coming Challenge for International Environmental Law?

This paper tests a model of cross-national variation in participation, using survey data from Spain, Brazil, and Korea. We posit a continuum ranging from neighborhood ties through membership in voluntary associations to political participation. The gap between Spain and peer countries grows as the continuum shifts from prepolitical to political spheres. (continue)

Democratization and Participation: Comparing Spain, Brazil, and Korea

This paper tests a model of cross-national variation in participation, using survey data from Spain, Brazil, and Korea. We posit a continuum ranging from neighborhood ties through membership in voluntary associations to political participation. The gap between Spain and peer countries grows as the continuum shifts from prepolitical to political spheres. Our model highlights three factors-labor market participation, gender, and religiosity-as determinants of cross-national differences in civic engagement. The impact of employment and gender is consistent with previous studies of their role in conditioning participation. (continue)

International Civic Engagement blog

The International Civic Engagement blog highlights initiatives from across the globe that improve civic engagement. The blog reflects the philosophy of its publisher, Erik Bergrud, that much can be learned not only within developed countries but also within the developing world. Bergrud, who plays an active role in the United Nations Online Network in Public Administration and Finance (UNPAN) and edits UNPAN's newsletter, posts a significant number of entries on the work of UN agencies and on how institutions of higher education have embraced civic engagement. The blog also reflects Bergrud's interest in e-government and online citizen participation. (continue)

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