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Posts with the Tag “civility”

Talking about Guns and Violence: Strategies for Facilitating Constructive Dialogues

This 11-page essay by Greg Keidan, a public engagement specialist and writer in the San Francisco Bay Area, was written for the University of AZ’s National Institute for Civil Discourse (NICD).  After the December 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, NICD called for essays to address the challenges of conducting constructive conversations about gun violence in the U.S. As part of their mission, NICD seeks to promote civil discourse on issues of public interest and does not take a policy position on gun violence or gun control but is committed […] (continue)

Video: Building a Culture of Participation with Dave Meslin

Simon Fraser University’s Centre for Dialogue commissioned this short video of the well-known Toronto-based community organizer Dave Meslin in May 2013. The video showcases Meslin’s ideas to increase civic engagement and makes the case for why involving citizens in decision-making is critical in improving our cities. The video also marks the 2013 Bruce and Lis Welch Community Dialogue, titled Building a Culture of Participation. This event brought together City of Vancouver employees, members of the City’s Engaged City Task Force and community members to explore […] (continue)

The Four-Legged Stool

This report to the Kettering Foundation focuses on civil society and “the need for a stronger associational life for citizens.”  John McKnight, professor emeritus and co-director of the Asset-Based Community Development Institute at Northwestern University and author of the report, “distinguishes associations from not-for-profit corporations, though they are often combined as the third leg of a “three-legged stool,” the other legs being business and government. He points out their differences: not-for-profit corporations are usually formal and hierarchical, whereas associations tend to be informal and horizontal; not-for-profits use the […] (continue)

The Armory as Argument: Cultural Communication Practices and the (Dangerous) Prospects for Civil Discourse about Gun Violence in the U.S.

This 10-page essay by Stephen D. Konieczka, Ph.D, Educator and researcher at the University of Colorado, was written for the University of AZ’s National Institute for Civil Discourse (NICD).  After the December 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, NICD called for essays to address the challenges of conducting constructive conversations about gun violence in the U.S. As part of their mission, NICD seeks to promote civil discourse on issues of public interest and does not take a policy position on gun violence or gun control but is committed to encouraging […] (continue)

Aim Higher, Dig Deeper

This article addresses why it is so difficult for our country to navigate the issue of gun violence and contains suggestions for starting a national conversation. It was written by Sarah Read and Dave Overfelt, both of The Communications Center, Inc. in Columbia, MO with funding from the University of AZ’s National Institute for Civil Discourse (NICD).  After the December 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, NICD called for essays to address the challenges of conducting constructive conversations about gun violence in the U.S. As part of their […] (continue)

The Binary Problem: Marginalizing Important Issues Related to Gun Violence

This 5-page essay by Regina Kelly, a PhD student at the University of Arizona, was written for the University of AZ’s National Institute for Civil Discourse (NICD).  After the December 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, NICD called for essays to address the challenges of conducting constructive conversations about gun violence in the U.S. As part of their mission, NICD seeks to promote civil discourse on issues of public interest and does not take a policy position on gun violence or gun control but is […] (continue)

Let’s Talk Politics

It has become fashionable these days to decry the decline of public discourse and civility. What makes this 2013 book, Let’s Talk Politics: Restoring Civility Through Exploratory Discussion, unique is that it makes it possible for any citizen to do something about both problems.  The first chapter of the book reviews some of the evidence for the decline in civility but then quickly shifts gears to explain in depth why declining civility should concern us all. A follow-up chapter counters a series of common excuses for […] (continue)

Dealing with Deeply Held Concerns and Other Challenges to Public Engagement Processes

The Institute for Local Government’s Public Engagement Program offers a draft (as of Jan 2013) 7-page document to help local officials design and prepare for public engagement processes that are effective, responsive and civil - even when participants hold very strong views. It begins… (continue)

Why Can’t We Talk? Christian Wisdom on Dialogue as a Habit of the Heart

Why Can’t We Talk? Christian Wisdom on Dialogue as a Habit of the Heart examines the connection between Christian values and good dialogue practices.  From the author… As practitioners, we deal in process all the time. But what can we do before the process to prepare ourselves for dialogue? Why Can’t We Talk? Christian Wisdom on Dialogue as a Habit of the Heart (SkyLight Paths, November 2012) explores a wealth of strategies and resources—ancient spiritual practices, fundamental mindshifts, and “practical” steps—that can reorient our deepest […] (continue)

Civil Dialogue™ at ASU

The term “Civil Dialogue,” as used by colleagues at Arizona State University, refers to a structured format for public dialogue. On their website, at www.civil-dialogue.com, they describe their work as “Using structured, public dialogue to build a bridge across the chasm of polarized viewpoints on hot topics, and to restore civility in public discourse.” The format was created at the Hugh Downs School of Human Communication at Arizona State University and continues to be developed by John Genette, Jennifer Linde, Clark Olson, and other scholars. (continue)

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