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Posts with the Tag “Deliberative Polling”

Dialogue & Deliberation Methods

Written by NCDD director Sandy Heierbacher to expand upon the text on our “What Are Dialogue & Deliberation?” page. This resource provides enough details to enable you to decide which of these leading dialogue and deliberation methods you should learn more about. In addition to looking at which methods fit your intentions, you will need to consider which methods are aligned with your resources, timeline, and the people you feel need to be involved. The text below is drawn from NCDD’s Engagement Streams Framework. AmericaSpeaks […] (continue)

How Can a Democracy Solve Tough Problems?

This September 2, 2010 article by Joe Klein on the Time Magazine website compares Jim Fishkin's Deliberative Polling process with the kleroterion process used in ancient Athens (a citizen decision-making process that used random selection), and suggests that rather than appointing a "blue-ribbon" commission to study the federal deficit, Obama ought to have initiated a deliberative democracy program using Deliberative Polling. (continue)

When the People Speak: Deliberative Democracy and Public Consultation

All over the world, democratic reforms have brought power to the people, but under conditions where the people have little opportunity to think about the power that they exercise. In this 2009 book, NCDD member James Fishkin, creator of Deliberative Polling, combines a new theory of democracy with actual practice and shows how an idea that harks back to ancient Athens can be used to revive our modern democracies. (continue)

Ancient Athens online: Democracy is about discussion, not just voting

NCDD member Jim Fishkin was featured in a May 6, 2010 article in The Economist print edition. Jim is the Director of the Center for Deliberative Democracy at Stanford and creator of the Deliberative Poll. The article, titled “Ancient Athens online: Democracy is about discussion, not just voting” can be viewed in full at this link on The Economist’s website. The full text is quoted below. (continue)

Deliberative Polling

Deliberative Polling (continue)

Common Sense California

The mission of Common Sense California is to serve as a civic bridge between the citizens of California and our elected officials. We hope to improve and reform the broken system of governance in California so that, together, we can face and resolve the significant, long term challenges facing our state. We span a broad spectrum of professional disciplines and perspectives. We are Republicans, Democrats and Independents. (continue)

Designing for Deliberative Democracy: Theory and Practice

The author of this presentation shows deliberative polling and a small sample of online deliberation as possible designs for deliberative democracy. For deliberative polling, the author reviews Fishkin's model as well as displays a New Haven Regional Deliberative Poll as an example. The online deliberation models under review are e-thePeople, Web Lab, and Unchat, among others. (continue)

A Spectrum of Politics and Governance Grounded in Empowered Citizen Dialogue and Deliberation

This article addresses the question of how to connect different forms of citizen dialogue and deliberation - from mass participatory contexts to more complex forms of deliberation with limited participation - to generate collective wisdom that is truly democratic. (continue)

Doing Democracy: How Deliberative Polling Works

Citizens are looking for a stronger voice in government decision making. They are becoming less willing to have decisions made for them by government, and are more inclined to trust their own judgment in political matters. This 2001 paper byNancy Averill (Canadian Government Executive, 1, 11-13) provides an overview of deliberative polling, detailing how it can give powerful insights into the public's true thoughts. (continue)

People & Participation: How to Put Citizens at the Heart of Decision-making

This 116-page guide was developed for public bodies such as local authorities, government departments or other statutory agencies who commission or deliver participatory processes; those with similar roles in the voluntary and private sectors; and people who want to know what to expect when they get involved in decision-making processes. This document is the first publication from UK-based Involve. It is based on research funded by the Home Office Civil Renewal Unit during 2004/5. Involve aims to create new systems that enable people to influence decisions and get involved in actions that affect their lives. (continue)

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