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Posts with the Tag “dialogue”

Building a Culture of Participation: Citizen Engagement in Vancouver, BC

The “Building a Culture of Participation” report describes workshop outcomes and participant ideas to empower citizens of Vancouver, British Columbia in official city decision-making. This May 2013 workshop brought together City of Vancouver employees, members of Vancouver’s Engaged City Task Force and community members and was jointly presented by Simon Fraser University’s Centre for Dialogue, SFU Public Square and the City of Vancouver. Feature guest and community organizer Dave Meslin presented examples of active citizen engagement from his projects in the Greater Toronto Area. Meslin […] (continue)

Video: Dave Meslin on the Importance of Dialogue

Simon Fraser University’s Centre for Dialogue commissioned a series of short videos of the well-known Toronto-based community organizer Dave Meslin in May 2013. In this second video of the series, Meslin describes why dialogue is a critical but missing part of the political process. The video series marks the 2013 Bruce and Lis Welch Community Dialogue, titled Building a Culture of Participation. This event brought together City of Vancouver employees, members of the City’s Engaged City Task Force and community members to explore opportunities for […] (continue)

Dialogue Theories

This 2013 book by Frances Sleap and Omer Sener aims to advance theoretical and practical engagement with dialogue by introducing the work of ten individuals who have made important and insightful contributions to thought in this area. The thinkers selected come from diverse fields, from religious studies and interfaith dialogue, through philosophy and social theory, to communication studies, public opinion analysis and even quantum physics. (continue)

Video: Building a Culture of Participation with Dave Meslin

Simon Fraser University’s Centre for Dialogue commissioned this short video of the well-known Toronto-based community organizer Dave Meslin in May 2013. The video showcases Meslin’s ideas to increase civic engagement and makes the case for why involving citizens in decision-making is critical in improving our cities. The video also marks the 2013 Bruce and Lis Welch Community Dialogue, titled Building a Culture of Participation. This event brought together City of Vancouver employees, members of the City’s Engaged City Task Force and community members to explore […] (continue)

Gather: The Art and Science of Effective Convening

Over the last century, The Rockefeller Foundation has seen the incredible power of convening to create shared dialogue, to debate pathways to impact and to catalyze groundbreaking ideas and history making sectors. Learning from this past, the Foundation and our partners at Monitor Institute saw a critical and unmet need to document the skills, training, and competencies that go into a successful convening.  They present the result of two years of work with the 2013 publication of Gather: The Art and Science of Effective Convening – a unique guidebook for convening […] (continue)

Making Dialogue Effective

This booklet, published by registered charity the Dialogue Society in 2013, brings together key insights and recommendations from a series of discussions exploring the role and value of dialogue and considering how its quality might be improved and its reach extended. The discussions brought together dialogue professionals, religious leaders, conflict resolution specialists, academics and other professionals with a wealth of relevant experience, to tackle questions such as the following: Does dialogue really extend beyond the tea-fuelled self-congratulation of a few liberal religious believers? Does it […] (continue)

Reaching Out Across the Red Blue Divide

Many people are reluctant to discuss politics across party lines.  This 4-page guide entitled Reaching Out Across the Red Blue Divide, One Person at a Time (available for download in PDF format) by PCP Associate and NCDD member Maggie Herzig is a step-by-step approach to inviting one other person—someone whose perspectives differ from your own—into a conversation, focusing on developing a better understanding of each other’s perspectives.  Here’s an excerpt from the guide… Why bother to reach across the divide? Many people have at least one […] (continue)

Circle Process

We found this description of the “Circle Process” here on the Art of Hosting website. The circle, or council, is an ancient form of meeting that has gathered human beings into respectful conversation for thousands of years. The circle has served as the foundation for many cultures. What transforms a meeting into a circle is the willingness of people to shift from informal socializing or opinionated discussion into a receptive attitude of thoughtful speaking and deep listening and to embody and practice the structures outlined here. (continue)

Peacebuilders

Peacebuilders is a youth focused, not-for- profit, charitable organization based in Toronto, Canada. Peacebuilders was established to improve the lives of youth, by providing them with appropriate access to justice so that they are empowered to overcome personal challenges and are able to realize their full potential. The mission of Peacebuilders is to support youth and adults to manage conflict through Peacebuilding Circles. Peacebuilders programs not only help to keep young people in school and out of the criminal justice system, but also help to […] (continue)

Let’s Talk Politics

It has become fashionable these days to decry the decline of public discourse and civility. What makes this 2013 book, Let’s Talk Politics: Restoring Civility Through Exploratory Discussion, unique is that it makes it possible for any citizen to do something about both problems.  The first chapter of the book reviews some of the evidence for the decline in civility but then quickly shifts gears to explain in depth why declining civility should concern us all. A follow-up chapter counters a series of common excuses for […] (continue)

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