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Posts with the Tag “facilitation technique”

Photo Voice

Photovoice is a process of collecting information and expressing issues and concerns through photos. Photovoice is highly flexible and can be adapted to specific participatory goals (such as needs assessment, asset mapping, and evaluation), different groups and communities, and distinct policy and community issues. (continue)

Popcorn

In a Talking Circle, people's turns are decided by the passing of an object around the circle. The sequence is totally predictable. This is highly structured dialogue. Sometimes a group wants to use an object to guide their discussion but they don't want to go around in a circle. They want more spontaneity. So the object is returned to the center after each turn and picked up by whoever wishes to speak next. This is sometimes called 'popcorn' because the object pops in and out of the center. Since it is a bit less structured, it is considered more 'open' than a formal Talking Circle. (continue)

Reflection

Reflection refers to thoughtfulness, concentration, meditation, contemplation - especially the calm, careful, continued consideration of something. Often it involves observing and coming to understand the functioning of one's own mind or heart (which is sometimes called self-reflexive awareness). (continue)

Talking Circle

Talking Circle is a different kind of meeting than most modern people are used to. The focus is on deepening, exploring and learning together, not on getting things done or completing an agenda. It is possible, with expert facilitation and savvy participation, to do both linear and circular modes in one meeting. Talking Circles are also referred to as Talking Stick Circles, Listening Circles, Wisdom Circles, and the Council Process. (continue)

Random Selection of Citizens for Technological Decision Making

This paper considers citizen participation in technological decision-making through random selection deliberative mechanisms such as citizens' jury, consensus conference, televote and deliberative poll. (continue)

The Art of Powerful Questions: Catalyzing Insight, Innovation and Action

This comprehensive guide explores the three dimensions of a powerful question - construction, scope and assumptions - and then offers sample questions for focusing collective attention, finding deeper insight and creating forward movement. This 18-page guide is a freely downloadable PDF document. (continue)

The Art of Hosting Good Conversations Online

In this great list of pointers for hosts of online conversations, Rheingold outlines what an online host hopes to achieve; characteristics of good online discussions and duties/behavior of a good host. (continue)

Beginning With the End in Mind

Issue framing is rooted in the belief that democracy depends upon people making choices together about how to deal with problems in their communities. Framing an issue for public deliberation requires us to examine a problem from many angles. It encourages us to be curious about - and even compassionate toward - ideas that differ from our own, so that our deliberations may help us discover common ground for action. A well-framed issue will be inclusive of differing perspectives and will be framed in public terms that citizens can relate to. This great 22-page workbook takes you through the various components or steps of framing an issue for public deliberation. (continue)

What’s Behind Issue Framing and Why Does it Matter?

In some way or another, most public issues need all of us to help remove the supports that keep the issues propped up and causing problems. The process of framing the approaches to the issues, and then deliberating them, assures that the issues get the complex attention they need. It is a foundation for multilateral action in the necessary combinations that most issues need, if we really intend to work on them. It assures we can discover and creatively use all perspectives - including, but not only, our favorite ones. (continue)

Reframing “Framing”

This 5-page article (2007) written by Will Friedman for Public Agenda addresses the concept of nonpartisan framing for deliberation, which aims to clarify the range of positions surrounding an issue so that citizens can better decide what they want to do. While framing has received significant mainstream attention of late, what is not being discussed is the limited context in which framing is conceived. The current infatuation with framing is concerned virtually exclusively with the power politics of parties and interest groups, and the winning or losing of […] (continue)

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