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Posts with the Tag “facilitation technique”

For Convenors and Moderators: Organizing for Public Deliberation and Moderating a Forum/Study Circle

This 24-page guide for moderators and convenors of National Issues Forums-style deliberation includes sections on how to get started, organizing a forum, moderating, reporting, posters, materials and more. (continue)

Issue Framing: Issue Books and Implications for Community Action

The Kettering Foundation long ago identified a disconnect between the public and politics. People in communities all over the country felt estranged from their elected representatives, from their public institutions, and most importantly, from each other. A significant portion of this disconnect focused on how issues in communities got named and framed. Kettering surmised, correctly, that if a public issue was named in such a way that the public could not identify with it, then the public would have a difficult time supporting it. However, if the public could identify a public problem together (naming) and then discuss choices on how to solve the particular problem (framing), then the likelihood of greater community action increased ten-fold. (continue)

Open Space for People Unable to Read

The following is an account of an Open Space Technology approach designed for people who are unable to read. The idea was conceived by a small group during the 2001 annual gathering of Open Space practitioners in Vancouver Canada. (continue)

Asset Based Community Development

Instead of focusing on a community's needs, deficiencies and problems, Asset Based Community Development (ABCD) helps communities become stronger and more self-reliant by discovering, mapping and mobilizing all their local assets. (continue)

Sample Ground Rules for D&D Processes

Facilitators of dialogic and deliberative processes often develop their own standard set of ground rules which they suggest groups adopt or modify to meet their needs. Here are some samples of ground rules from organizations which represent various streams of online and face-to-face D&D practice. Use this list to get new ideas for ground rules or to show a variety of sets of ground rules to facilitators you are training. (continue)

Issue Framing (archive from the NCDD Wiki)

A "frame" is a way of understanding or interpreting what is going on and how we should relate to it. How we frame an issue or conflict (or how it is framed for us) has a tremendous impact on what we do about it. This post was created in the NCDD wiki, and mainly features an article by Tom Atlee of the Co-Intelligence Institute. (continue)

Nominal Group Technique

Nominal group technique (NGT) is an alternative to brainstorming that uses a more structured format to obtain multiple inputs from several people on a particular problem or issue. (continue)

Photo Voice

Photovoice is a process of collecting information and expressing issues and concerns through photos. Photovoice is highly flexible and can be adapted to specific participatory goals (such as needs assessment, asset mapping, and evaluation), different groups and communities, and distinct policy and community issues. (continue)

Popcorn

In a Talking Circle, people's turns are decided by the passing of an object around the circle. The sequence is totally predictable. This is highly structured dialogue. Sometimes a group wants to use an object to guide their discussion but they don't want to go around in a circle. They want more spontaneity. So the object is returned to the center after each turn and picked up by whoever wishes to speak next. This is sometimes called 'popcorn' because the object pops in and out of the center. Since it is a bit less structured, it is considered more 'open' than a formal Talking Circle. (continue)

Reframing “Framing”

This 5-page article (2007) written by Will Friedman for Public Agenda addresses the concept of nonpartisan framing for deliberation, which aims to clarify the range of positions surrounding an issue so that citizens can better decide what they want to do. While framing has received significant mainstream attention of late, what is not being discussed is the limited context in which framing is conceived. The current infatuation with framing is concerned virtually exclusively with the power politics of parties and interest groups, and the winning or losing of […] (continue)

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