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Posts with the Tag “great for beginners”

Deliberative Publicity

Deliberative Publicity by Chris Karpowitz and Chad Raphael, was published on the Deliberative Democracy Consortium blog in April 2015. The article talks about the evolving role of publicity around deliberative forums, and how deliberative publicity has the power to amplify the public’s voice and create meaningful connections to the larger political structure. Karpowitz and Raphael analyzed a wide variety of deliberative forum practices, and found that many had opportunities for improvement when publicizing a forum around transparency and accurately sharing participant’s viewpoints. They recognized the growing […] (continue)

How to Recruit Dialogue Participants

How to Recruit Dialogue Participants, published June 2015 by Everyday Democracy, includes five tips to for getting a well-rounded group of dialogue participants together. The one-page read has five recommendations for having a successful dialogue, including: reviewing dialogue recruitment goals, developing talking points, plan outreach strategies, give coalition members recruiting assignments, and take extra steps to recruit underrepresented groups. The article can be read below and found on Everyday Democracy’s website here. From Everyday Democracy (continue)

The Issue Guide and the Issue Forum: Political Inventions (Connections 2015)

This three-page article, The Issue Guide and the Issue Forum: Political Inventions, by Brad Rourke was published in Kettering Foundation‘s annual newsletter, “Connections 2015 – Our History: Journeys in KF Research” in the fall of 2015.  In the article, Rourke discusses the relationship between Kettering’s research and the National Issues Forums; how the Foundation’s research lead to the creation of NIFI’s issue guides, which were put into practice within the forums. What emerged was a better understanding of how individuals wrestled with their most wicked problems on […] (continue)

Leadership Compass Activity

This five-page activity from Everyday Democracy titled, Leadership Compass Activity, was published January 2015 and helps to determine the leadership styles of participants within an action group. The activity is meant to be done with an organizing or action group on its first or second meeting. The group individually answers 27 questions to determine whether their leadership style is that of a: Nurturer, Teacher, Mobilizer, or Visionary. After finding out your personal leadership style, the group breaks into smaller groups to discuss positive aspects of […] (continue)

Reaching Out Across the Red-Blue Divide, One Person at a Time

The four-page conversation guide, Reaching Out Across the Red-Blue Divide, One Person at a Time (2009), was written by Maggie Herzig from Public Conversations Project. This useful guide provides a framework for navigating highly polarized conversations and includes several starter questions to help keep the dialogue open. Read the intro to the guide below and download the PDF, as well as, find the original guide on PCP’s blog here. From the guide… What this guide offers This guide offers a step-by-step approach to inviting one other person—someone whose […] (continue)

The Social Justice Phrase Guide

The Social Justice Phrase Guide is two-page guide created by Advancement Project, in collaboration with The Opportunity Agenda. This guide puts forth five guidelines for conscientious communication, that give examples of alternative phrases and metaphors to replace out-dated ones that are offensive and/or discriminatory. View the guide below or download it here. From Advancement Project… Advancing a social justice agenda starts with being smart and deliberate in how we frame our discourse. The Social Justice Phrase Guide is your go-to tool to craft inclusive messages. Whether developing […] (continue)

Searching for Wise Questions

The article, Searching for Wise Questions, by Laura Chasin was published September 2011 and discusses how the way questions are framed can dramatically shape the answer. Written with the September 11, 2001 attacks in mind, the article offers opportunities to frame questions in a way that heal rather than divide. Below is an excerpt from the article and the full piece can be found on Public Conversations Project’s website here. From the article… My experience conducting dialogues among those who have fierce differences about issues such as abortion […] (continue)

Designing Digital Democracy: A Short Guide

This May 2015 blog article, Designing digital democracy: a short guide, by Geoff Mulgan of Nesta, provides a guide to designing public participation processes. Mulgan gives several points of clarity to consider when designing a process, like: what is the purpose of the engagement, who is trying to be reached, what are appropriate tools [digital and/or F2F], the scale of the effort and taking into considerations the desire for anonymity. Below is the full article and the link to the original piece can be found here. Read […] (continue)

@Stake: A Role-Playing Card Game

The Engagement Lab at Emerson College created @Stake, a role-playing card game used to foster decision-making, empathy and collaboration. The players take various roles and create questions based on real life issues to deliberate on during the game. All participants pitch their ideas under a time limit and one of the players, “The Decider” will choose who has the best idea and award points. More about the game Development of @Stake: Planning issues often involve conflicting interests coupled with deep resentments and community divides. Building a new […] (continue)

Public Participation for 21st Century Democracy

The 368-page book, Public Participation for 21st Century Democracy, written by Matt Leighninger and Tina Nabatchi was published May 2015. The book aims to improve public participation infrastructure, the way that citizens are engaged, addressing issues that arise and strengthening the community. Public Participation for 21st Century Democracy explores the theory and practice of public participation in decision-making and problem-solving. It examines how public participation developed over time to include myriad thick, thin, and conventional opportunities, occurring in both face-to-face meetings and online settings. The book explores the use […] (continue)

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