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Posts with the Tag “highly recommended”

NCDD’s Engagement Streams Framework

NCDD's Engagement Streams Framework helps people decide which dialogue and deliberation method(s) are most appropriate for their circumstance. The framework is a series of two charts that categorize the D&D field into four streams based on intention or purpose (Exploration, Conflict Transformation, Decision Making, and Collaborative Action), and show which of the most well-known methods have proven themselves effective in which streams. The second chart goes into more detail about 23 dialogue and deliberation methods, and includes information such as group size, meeting type and how participants are selected. (continue)

Deliberative Democracy’s Attempt to Turn Politics into Law

Drawing on an example of President Bush's decision as to whether or not to fund stem cell research, the author explores what it takes to make a possible constituency-altering decision for politicians. A multitude of factors go into the mix for the decision, including who is involved in the public in the debate and how those people turnout to vote in the election. The author goes on to look at the feelings of Americans in times of crisis and the leaders' actions in response. (continue)

Democracy as Problem Solving: Civic Capacity in Communities

Complexity, division, mistrust, and “process paralysis” can thwart leaders and others when they tackle local challenges. In Democracy as Problem Solving, Xavier de Souza Briggs (2008, MIT Press) shows how civic capacity—the capacity to create and sustain smart collective action—can be developed and used. In an era of sharp debate over the conditions under which democracy can develop while broadening participation and building community, Briggs argues that understanding and building civic capacity is crucial for strengthening governance and changing the state of the world in […] (continue)

Making Change Happen: Advocacy and Citizen Participation

In November 2001, forty-nine people engaged in advocacy and citizen participation efforts in countries of Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America, North America and Europe came together for a meeting on Making Change Happen: Advocacy & Citizen Participation. Co-sponsored by ActionAid-USA, the Asia Foundation, the Participation Group at the Institute of Development Studies, and Just Associates, the purpose of the meeting was twofold: bring together activists, researchers, trainers and other practitioners to discuss the challenges and successes of citizen-centered advocacy in different country contexts and the world's dramatically changing political environment; produce a core set of lessons and recommendations to help donors and international NGOs refine their support strategies for training and action for participatory advocacy. (continue)

Ladder of Inference

The "ladder of inference" concept explains why most people don't usually remember where their deepest attitudes came from. The data is long since lost to memory, after years of inferential leaps. Being aware of the ladder of inference enables peopel to improve their communications and thinking by (1) becoming more aware of your own thinking and reasoning (reflection); making your thinking and reasoning more visible to others (advocacy); and inquiring into others' thinking and reasoning (inquiry). (continue)

Changing the Conversation on Education in Connecticut

A 2005 report by Public Agenda on 10 years of public engagement on public education topics in over 70 communities across Connecticut. Supported by the William Caspar Graustein Memorial Fund, the report serves as a comprehensive case study of how public engagement can work in communities across America and discusses the specific accomplishments in Connecticut. (continue)

Turning to One Another: Simple Conversations to Restore Hope to the Future

“I believe we can change the world if we start talking to one another again.” With this simple declaration, Margaret Wheatley proposes in her 2002 book that people band together with their colleagues and friends to create the solutions for real social change, both locally and globally, that are so badly needed. Such change will not come from governments or corporations, she argues, but from the ageless process of thinking together in conversation. “Turning to One Another” encourages this process. Part I explores the power […] (continue)

On Dialogue

David Bohm was one of the greatest physicists and foremost thinkers of this century. This revised and expanded edition is the most comprehensive documentation to date of David Bohm's dialogical world view. Bohm explores the purpose, methods and meanings of the multi-faceted process he called "dialogue", suggesting that dialogue offers the possibility of an entirely new order of communication and relationship with ourselves, our fellows, and the world around us. His book offers tools that facilitate a true exchange of ideas between people. (continue)

National Issues Forums

The term "National Issues Forums" is used to refer to both a network of programs and a deliberative process. National Issues Forums (NIF) is an independent network of civic and educational groups which use "issue books" as a basis for deliberative choice work in forums based on the town meeting tradition. NIF issue books use research on the public's concerns to identify three or four options or approaches to an issue. Presenting issues in this way invites citizens to confront the conflicts among different options and avoids the usual debates in which people lash out with simplistic arguments. (continue)

Creating a Culture of Collaboration: The International Association of Facilitators Handbook

Collaboration is often viewed as a one-time or project-oriented activity. An increasing challenge is to help organizations incorporate collaborative values and practices in their everyday ways of working. In Creating a Culture of Collaboration, an international group of practitioners and researchers - from Australia, Belgium, Canada, Chile, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom, and the United States - provide proven approaches to creating a culture of collaboration within and among groups, organizations, communities, and societies. (continue)

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