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Posts with the Tag “partisan divide”

The Transpartisan Listserv

The Transpartisan Listserv was launched in March 2014 by the National Coalition for Dialogue & Deliberation, Mediators Foundation, and over a dozen co-founders who are leaders in political bridge building work. The purpose of this moderated listserv is to introduce potential colleagues to one another, to expand our knowledge of transpartisan theory and practice, and to showcase ongoing activity in the transpartisan field. Our goal is to provide a simple, safe communication channel where individuals and organizations that are active in this boundary-crossing work can connect […] (continue)

Political Fix: How Do We Get American Politics Back on Track? (NIF Issue Guide)

One of the National Issues Forums Institute’s issue guides, Political Fix: How Do We Get American Politics Back on Track? outlines this critical public issue and several choices or approaches to addressing the issue. National Issues Forums do not advocate a specific solution or point of view, but provide citizens the opportunity to consider a broad range of choices, weigh the pros and cons of those options, and meet with each other in a public dialogue to identify the concerns they hold in common. From the […] (continue)

Reaching Out Across the Red Blue Divide

Many people are reluctant to discuss politics across party lines.  This 4-page guide entitled Reaching Out Across the Red Blue Divide, One Person at a Time (available for download in PDF format) by PCP Associate and NCDD member Maggie Herzig is a step-by-step approach to inviting one other person—someone whose perspectives differ from your own—into a conversation, focusing on developing a better understanding of each other’s perspectives.  Here’s an excerpt from the guide… Why bother to reach across the divide? Many people have at least one […] (continue)

Governing America: Our Choices, Our Challenge (NIF Issue Guide)

One of the National Issues Forums Institute’s issue guides, Governing America: Our Choices, Our Challenge outlines this public issue and several choices or approaches to addressing the issue. National Issues Forums do not advocate a specific solution or point of view, but provide citizens the opportunity to consider a broad range of choices, weigh the pros and cons of those options, and meet with each other in a public dialogue to identify the concerns they hold in common. This 1997-1998 NIF issue book presents three […] (continue)

The Battle Over Abortion: Seeking Common Ground in a Divided Nation (NIF Issue Guide)

One of the National Issues Forums Institute’s issue guides, The Battle Over Abortion: Seeking Common Ground in a Divided Nation outlines this public issue and several choices or approaches to addressing the issue. National Issues Forums do not advocate a specific solution or point of view, but provide citizens the opportunity to consider a broad range of choices, weigh the pros and cons of those options, and meet with each other in a public dialogue to identify the concerns they hold in common. In one […] (continue)

Dealing with Deeply Held Concerns and Other Challenges to Public Engagement Processes

The Institute for Local Government’s Public Engagement Program offers a draft (as of Jan 2013) 7-page document to help local officials design and prepare for public engagement processes that are effective, responsive and civil – even when participants hold very strong views. It begins… (continue)

Civil Dialogue™ at ASU

The term “Civil Dialogue,” as used by colleagues at Arizona State University, refers to a structured format for public dialogue. On their website, at www.civil-dialogue.com, they describe their work as “Using structured, public dialogue to build a bridge across the chasm of polarized viewpoints on hot topics, and to restore civility in public discourse.” The format was created at the Hugh Downs School of Human Communication at Arizona State University and continues to be developed by John Genette, Jennifer Linde, Clark Olson, and other scholars. (continue)

The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion

Why can’t our political leaders work together as threats loom and problems mount? Why do people so readily assume the worst about the motives of their fellow citizens? In The Righteous Mind, social psychologist Jonathan Haidt explores the origins of our divisions and points the way forward to mutual understanding. His starting point is moral intuition—the nearly instantaneous perceptions we all have about other people and the things they do. These intuitions feel like self-evident truths, making us righteously certain that those who see things differently are […] (continue)

You’re Not as Crazy as I Thought, But You’re Still Wrong

Jacob Z. Hess is a Mormon, a community psychologist, and a devoted conservative, while Phil Neisser is an atheist, a leftist, and a college professor. Yet in 2009, after meeting at an NCDD conference, they embarked on a two-year conversation about the issues that divide them. The result is “You’re not as Crazy as I Thought,” an entertaining dialogue about power, government, media, religion, morality, gender roles, sexual orientation, race, and more. Drawing on the latest debates in social and political theory, Hess and Neisser […] (continue)

Money and Politics (NIF Report)

This report is an analysis of what happened in 2001 National Issues Forums (NIF) that took place in 44 states and the District of Columbia on “Money and Politics,” a sample of the hundreds of NIF forums that continue to take place across the country. To learn how citizens feel about this issue, Doble Research Associates, a public interest consulting firm, analyzed what happened in these forums, including questionnaire results from 1,457 participants who sent in a questionnaire by August 1, 2001. Find more details & […] (continue)

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