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Posts with the Tag “Peter Levine”

These resources and publications were authored in part or in full by Peter Levine, Director of CIRCLE and Lincoln Filene Professor of Citizenship & Public Affairs at Tufts.

Activists’ Views of Deliberation

Based on more than 60 interviews, this 2007 article by Peter Levine of the University of Maryland and Rose Marie Nierras of the University of Sussex explores the tensions between deliberation and various forms of political activism and advocacy. It identifies more than 20 objections to deliberation that are proposed by political activists in various countries and contexts. It concludes with suggestions for combining deliberation and advocacy. Download the article here. (continue)

Where is Democracy Headed? report

“Where is Democracy Headed?” (2008) is a report published by the Deliberative Democracy Consortium (DDC) which summarizes more than four years of the DDC’s learnings about deliberation, decision-making, and problem-solving. The publication was drafted by Peter Levine (Tufts University) and Lars Hasselbad Torres (Global Peace Tiles Project), then revised by DDC members through a wiki. Its findings were gathered from interviews, face-to-face discussions, and the wiki. The report was published with the support of the Kettering Foundation and has two major sections. The first part […] (continue)

The Path Not Taken (So Far): Civic Engagement for Reform

The Path Not Taken (So Far): Civic Engagement for Reform written by Peter Levine, outlines the Obama Administration’s failure–so far–to engage the public in our great national challenges. Peter writes… Candidate Obama argued that positive change comes from organized social movements, not from the government alone. Social movements should be broad-based, not narrow groups of people who all agree with one another. They should promote discussion and collaboration across lines of difference–including ideological difference. As he said in May 2007, “politics” usually means shouting matches on […] (continue)

The Deliberative Democracy Handbook: Strategies for Effective Civic Engagement in the Twenty-First Century

The Deliberative Democracy Handbook is a terrific resource for democratic practitioners and theorists alike. It combines rich case material from many cities and types of institutional settings with careful reflection on core principles. It generates hope for a renewed democracy, tempered with critical scholarship and political realism. Most important, this handbook opens a spacious window on the innovativeness of citizens in the U.S. (and around the world) and shows how the varied practices of deliberative democracy are part of a larger civic renewal movement. (continue)

Peter Levine’s Blog

Peter Levine is Director of CIRCLE, The Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (www.civicyouth.org). CIRCLE conducts and funds research on young people's civic education and participation. Levine is also a Research Scholar at the Institute for Philosophy and Public Policy in the University of Maryland's School of Public Policy. He is chair of the executive committee of the Campaign for the Civic Mission of Schools and a member of the executive committee of the Deliberative Democracy Consortium. Levine's blog primarily covers topics related to youth civic engagement and deliberative democracy. (continue)

The Future of Democracy: Developing the Next Generation of American Citizens

In recent years, young Americans have become dangerously less engaged. They are tolerant, patriotic, and idealistic, and some have invented such novel and impressive forms of civic engagement, as blogs, 'buycott' movements, and transnational youth networks. But most lack the skills and opportunities they need to participate in politics or address public problems. Levine's timely manifesto clearly explains the causes, symptoms, and repercussions of this damaging trend, and, most importantly, the means whereby America can confront and reverse it. (continue)

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