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Posts with the Tag “public policy dispute resolution”

Can America’s Democracy Be Improved?

Ideally, the democratic process ought to "direct the exercise of political rights toward the satisfaction of interests" and operate in ways that involve and educate all relevant stakeholders . The current structure and practice of representative democracy in the United States fall short of this ideal in several ways. First, too few people are involved in a meaningful way in most decisions that affect them and their communities, and there is too much dependence on electing representatives to speak on behalf of those whom they serve. Second, there is an over-reliance on majority rule, and a lack of emphasis on forging political consensus. This means that the concerns of certain "minorities" are constantly ignored. Very little effort has been made to increase the capacity of people who disagree or come from disparate schools of thought to interact in ways that encourage deeper understanding or reconciliation of differences. (continue)

Online Dialogue on Conflict/Situation Assessments

The fundamental aim of the Online Dialogue on Conflict/Situation Assessment was to simultaneously advance the field's experience and thinking in two areas: the use of online tools and the practice of conflict/situation assessment. The impetus for the 2003 Online Dialogue on Conflict/Situation Assessment project evolved out of two roundtable discussions held during the 2002 Conference on Environmental Conflict Resolution, hosted by the U. S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution (U.S. Institute) in Tucson, Arizona. One of these roundtables discussed the theory and practice of conflict/situation assessments; the other talked about the use of cutting-edge online technology to improve environmental and public policy dispute resolution and policy formulation. (continue)

Stakeholder Involvement & Public Participation at the U.S. EPA: Lessons Learned, Barriers, & Innovative Approaches

With this report, the Office of Environmental Policy Innovation (OEPI) has taken a fresh look at Agency efforts to involve the public by reviewing formal evaluations and informal summaries from across the Agency that identify, describe, and/or evaluate Agency stakeholder involvement and public participation activities. Based upon their review, OEPI identifies key crosscutting lessons learned, pinpoint unique barriers and ways to overcome them, and highlight innovative approaches to stakeholder involvement and public participation. (continue)

A Practical Guide to Consensus

This 75-page step-by-step handbook walks readers through the stages of sponsoring, organizing, and participating in a public policy consensus process. Designed primarily for government agencies or departments, the guide also is useful for any other sponsor of - or participant in - a consensus building process. (continue)

Trainer’s Manual: Getting The Most Out Of Consensus Processes

This Trainer's Manual, designed as a "workshop for public officials," provides essential information for any individual, agency or organization that participates in a collaborative process. The workshop is presented in eight modules, each covering an aspect of what has been found to be the "best practices" in participating in a collaborative or consensus building process. It is based on the Society of Professionals in Dispute Resolution (SPIDR) Report, "Best Practices for Government Agencies: Guidelines for Using Agreement-Seeking Processes." (continue)

JAMS Foundation

The JAMS Foundation, a non-profit corporation, provides financial assistance for conflict resolution initiatives with national impact, and shares its dispute resolution experience and judicial expertise for the benefit of the public interest. The Foundation encourages the use of alternative dispute resolution, supports education at all levels about collaborative processes for resolving differences, promotes innovation in conflict resolution, and advances the settlement of conflict worldwide. (continue)

Weil Program on Collaborative Governance

The Weil Program on Collaborative Governance's mission is to nurture a better understanding of the potential, limits, and proper realm of collaborative governance; to identify the professional skills that matter most in shaping effective, accountable collaboration in the service of common goals; and to promulgate those skills through the curricula of the Kennedy School of Government and other parts of Harvard University. (continue)

Case Study of the National Environmental Justice Advisory Council

NEJAC was created in 1993 as a part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Environmental Justice. NEJAC helps the OEJ address environmental justice issues and integrate environmental justice into the EPA's policies, programs and activities. It does this by bringing community, industry and state/local government groups together to find solutions to environmental justice problems and by providing the EPA with independent advice and recommendations on matters related to environmental justice. (continue)

Negotiating Enviromental Agreements: How to Avoid Escalating Confrontation, Needless Costs, and Unnecessary Litigation

Owning and managing forest lands is an inherently legal endeavor. From forest acquisition to deeds and boundaries, from timber sales to bequests, few things can be done without confronting laws, rules, regulations, and traditions that define acceptable and unacceptable practices. For most owners, managing forests is a learn-as-you-go proposition, and too often a crash course in law follows a disagreement. Legal Aspects of Owning and Managing Woodlands is both an accessible overview of the privileges, rights, and obligations that accompany forest ownership, and a guidebook to help active forest managers use laws to their advantage and avoid the pitfalls of expensive and exhausting litigation. (continue)

A Manager’s Guide to Resolving Conflicts in Collaborative Networks

This 50-page report expands on previous Center reports by adding an important practical tool for managers in networks: how to manage and negotiate the conflicts that may occur among a network's members. The approach they describe - interest-based negotiation - has worked in other settings, such as bargaining with unions. Such negotiation techniques are becoming crucial in sustaining the effectiveness of networks, where successful performance is defined by how well people collaborate and not by hierarchical commands. (continue)

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