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Posts with the Tag “public engagement”

Nebraskans Weigh in on Essential Educational Opportunities for All Students

This 2004 case study by the Public Agenda examines the organization’s work with the Nebraska State Board of Education and the Nebraska Department of Education, where it helped to design and implement a public engagement process to address the issue of how to define the "essential education" for all students. Public Agenda conducted focus groups and helped selected districts facilitate discussion forums with more than 370 parents, students, educators (teachers, principals and superintendents) and members of the general public. Resource Link: www.publicagenda.org/pages/nebraskans-weigh-in (continue)

Changing the Conversation on Education in Connecticut

A 2005 report by Public Agenda on 10 years of public engagement on public education topics in over 70 communities across Connecticut. Supported by the William Caspar Graustein Memorial Fund, the report serves as a comprehensive case study of how public engagement can work in communities across America and discusses the specific accomplishments in Connecticut. In the mid 1990's, research commissioned by the Graustein Memorial Fund in Connecticut and conducted by Public Agenda revealed significant gaps between the general public, community leaders and educators concerning […] (continue)

Smart Democracy: How to Engage Citizens

This September 2004 article by Matt Leighninger was published in an International City/County Management Association (ICMA) IQ Report, an electronic publication which is now called InFocus: Strategies and Solutions for Local Government Managers. The article summary below is taken from the ICMA Press website. Many local leaders are putting new emphasis on mobilizing citizens for dialogue, deliberation, and collaborative problem solving—a trend called “democratic governance” that is a fundamental shift in the way citizens and governments interact. Democratic governance gives citizens the opportunity to compare […] (continue)

Marrying Citizens and Educators in Decision Making

Marrying Citizens and Educators in Decision Making, written by Matt Leighninger, was published in the November 2005 issue of The School Administrator. The article discusses the increasing prevalence of cooperation between school administrators and the public and examines two specific cases of public engagement projects in Hamilton, Ontario, and and Winston-Salem, North Carolina. The introduction of the article is excerpted below; the full text can be found at http://www.aasa.org/SchoolAdministratorArticle.aspx?id=7752. The growing attraction between citizens and educators can form the basis of a fruitful school-community relationship. […] (continue)

A Guide to Participatory Budgeting

Participatory Budgeting (PB) programs are innovative policymaking processes. Citizens are directly involved in making policy decisions. Forums are held throughout the year so that citizens have the opportunity to allocate resources, prioritize broad social policies, and monitor public spending. These programs are designed incorporate citizens into the policymaking process, spur administrative reform, and distribute public resources to low-income neighborhoods. Download the 32-page guide directly from the NCDD website. (continue)

Democratising Power: Civic Engagement in the Decision Making Process

This report on democratising power profiles three different approaches to engaging the public in power-oriented decision-making. AmericaSpeaks' model of town meetings engages the ordinary citizen in the decision-making that affects him. The Center for Public Participation aims at empowering civic society to engage in government decisions by providing an enabling legal environment. The Non-Profit Partnership champions for a more sustainable non-profit sector. (continue)

An Empirical-Theoretical Analysis Framework for Public Participation in Environmental Impact Assessment

Public participation has been increasingly recognized as one of the most important aspects of environmental impact assessment. However, the definition of adequate evaluative criteria for public participation, with a strong theoretical backing, the functionality of empirical best practice and the consideration of the country-specific context, has remained elusive. The evaluative framework developed here is an attempt to fill this gap. (continue)

Putting “Public” Back in Public Health Work

Experts say chances of a deadly worldwide outbreak of pandemic flu are increasing. In order to involve the public in developing plans for how the government would react to such an outbreak, the CDC held four public meetings to hear public views about possible community control measures that could limit the outbreak. This report outlines and evaluates this award-winning project, which sought to put the "public" in public health by effectively allowing people to participate in policy development. (continue)

Evaluation of a Deliberative Conference

The concept of public participation is currently one of great interest to researchers and policy makers. In response to a perceived need for greater public involvement in decision making and policy formation processes on the part of both policymakers and the general public, a variety of novel mechanisms have been developed, such as the consensus conference and citizens jury, to complement traditional mechanisms, such as the public meeting. However, the relative effectiveness of the various mechanisms is unclear, as efforts at evaluation have been sparse. In this article, the authors describe an evaluation of a two-day "deliberative conference" on the topic of radiation dose assessment. (continue)

Scenario Workshops and Consensus Conferences: Towards more Democratic Decision-making

This paper reports on the use of consensus conference and scenario workshops by the Danish Board of Technology assessment. The methodology of both consensus conference and scenario workshops is explained, and the strengths and weakness are explored. The authors identify the following criteria to consider in developing further participatory models. (continue)

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