Tiny House
More About The National Coalition for Dialogue & Deliberation • Join Now!
Community News

Posts with the Tag “theory”

The Ways of Aristotle

This 2008 book by Olav Eikeland discusses the concepts of dialogue and deliberation as they emerged in the writings of Aristotle (especially) almost 2500 years ago, but with a clear link to modern action research. The full title of the book is "The Ways of Aristotle – Aristotelian Phrónêsis, Aristotelian Philosophy of Dialogue, and Action Research." Bern: Peter Lang Publishers (2008). (continue)

Governing The Commons

Governing The Commons (Google Books), a 1990 book by Elinor Ostrom, of The Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis at Indiana University, presents an approach to avoiding the 'tragedy of the commons.' She presents 8 criteria (see below) that are associated with sustainable management of "common-pool resources," which are non-excludable in physical accessibility (such as forests) but with harvests which are quite excludable (such as wood) in that only one person can use them. (continue)

Understanding Participation: A Literature Review

The Pathways through Participation looks at participation in a very broad way, and covers a wide range of participatory activities that are often viewed in isolation. This broad approach to participation has informed our literature review. (continue)

A Comprehensive Approach to Evaluating Deliberative Public Engagement

This 2008 essay by John Gastil (professor in the Department of Communication, University of Washington) provides a definition of citizen deliberation and suggests broad categories for evaluation, including design integrity, sound deliberation and judgment, influential conclusions/actions, and other secondary benefits (e.g., positive changes to individual participants’ civic attitudes and improvement in local political practices). Evaluation methods are identified for measuring each of these evaluation criteria, and summary recommendations consider how to conduct a thorough, integrated project assessment with a small or larger evaluation budget. Download […] (continue)

A Ladder of Citizen Participation

Sherry Arnstein, writing in 1969 about citizen involvement in planning processes in the United States, described a “ladder of citizen participation.” The ladder of citizen participation ranges from high citizen power to low (as pictured). See Sherry R. Arnstein’s “A Ladder of Citizen Participation,” Journal of the American Planning Association, Vol. 35, No. 4, July 1969, pp. 216-224. Available online here. This article is about power structures in society and how they interact. Specifically it is a guide to seeing who has power when important […] (continue)

New Social Inquiry journal

New Social Inquiry is an academic journal that publishes social research essays and relative works that are accessible to a wide audience, engaging and relevant for non-specialists, yet sophisticated and complex enough to push scholarship forward. Their first publication will focus on public dialogue. Here’s an excerpt from the guidelines for submission: Is there such a thing as public dialogue, now or in the past? If so, who participates, who leads, and what forms does it take? If not, how can it realistically be realized? […] (continue)

Democracy as Discussion: Civic Education and the American Forum Movement

Using primary sources from archives around the country, William M. Keith’s book Democracy as Discussion traces the early history of the Speech field, the development of discussion as an alternative to debate, and the Deweyan, Progressive philosophy of discussion that swept the United States in the early twentieth century. Available at Amazon.com. (continue)

Understanding Participation: A Literature Review

The 50-page Understanding Participation: A Literature Review review brings together different bodies of literature on participation, including literature on community development, volunteering, public participation, social movements, everyday politics and ethical consumption. It looks at the historical and current drivers of participation, the activities and actors of participation and different theoretical approaches that contribute to a better understanding of participation. It closes with our emerging ‘participation framework’ that we aim to further develop and refine in the subsequent stages of the project. This literature review forms […] (continue)

Who Wants to Deliberate – and Why?

Who Wants to Deliberate – and Why? is an article published as part of the Harvard Kennedy School’s Faculty Research Working Paper Series, co-authored by Michael Neblo, Kevin Esterling, Ryan Kennedy, David Lazer, and Anand Sokhey. It was published in the American Political Science Review Vol. 104, No. 3 (August 2010). This research suggests that willingness to participate in deliberative forms of political engagement is less tied to predictors like race, gender and income than willingness to participate in electoral politics. In the words of the […] (continue)

The Rhetoric of Public Dialogue

The Rhetoric of Public Dialogue (2003) by Rob Anderson, Kenneth N. Cissna, and Meghan K. Clune, was published in Communication Research Trends, 22(1), 2003, pp. 1-37. The authors begin by reviewing recent mostly book-length works related to public dialogue within the categories or metaphors of access and space, difference and voice, deliberation, and civility (with a separate section for public journalism). They go on to discuss a number of the more prominent contemporary public dialogue projects. NCDD figures prominently in this section, and the authors […] (continue)

-