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Posts with the Tag “tools”

Separate and Unequal in 1963: How Can We Create A Fair Society? (DMC Issue Guide)

Separate and Unequal in 1963: How Can We Create a Fair Society?, is a 22-page historical issue guide developed in 2014 by the David Mathews Center for Civic Life, Alabama Public Television (APT), and additional partners for use in a classroom setting. Download the Issue Guide PDF here. In Separate and Unequal in 1963, students are asked to place themselves in 1963 Birmingham, Alabama to deliberate together through the difficult choices faced by those working to address segregation and inequality. Additionally, students are encouraged to […] (continue)

Protecting Communities Serving the Public

The 42-page discussion guide, Protecting Communities Serving the Public (2000), from Everyday Democracy, is designed into five session to help build trust and respect between residents and police officers to co-create safer communities together. The guide reviews what the community-wide study circle program is, and each of the five sessions: Session 1- Starting out study circle: sharing our experiences Session 2- What’s the nature of the problem? Session 3- What do we expect from each other? Session 4- How can we make progress? Session 5- Committing to change: […] (continue)

Democratic Rules of Order: Easy-to-use rules for meetings of any size

The 72-page book, Democratic Rules of Order: Easy-to-use rules for meetings of any size (2010), by Fred Francis and Peg Francis, gives straight-forward rules of order for running meetings. Democratic Rules of Order demonstrate that efficient, democratic decision-making is a simple and natural process. Meetings that are governed by straightforward rules enable the Chair and the participants to focus on issues without being preoccupied with the rules. Within the simple meeting structure prescribed, members reach agreements more quickly and easily and ultimately, make better decisions. This book […] (continue)

Global Outreach in Local Communities…Bringing Worlds Together One Tip at a Time

The online guide, Global Outreach in Local Communities…Bringing Worlds Together One Tip at a Time (2015), is a collaborative effort from across sectors that began out of the Diversity Outreach Workshops in Multnomah County, Oregon. Read the preface below and access the guide online here. More about the guide… The volunteer Multnomah County Citizen Involvement Committee (CIC) with staff support from the Office of Citizen Involvement (OCI) began the Diversity Outreach Workshops in 2008. The CIC’s mission is to increase engagement and input by the public […] (continue)

7 Tips For Facilitating Discussions On Community-Police Relations

The article from Everyday Democracy, 7 Tips For Facilitating Discussions On Community-Police Relations, offers seven guidelines for creating a more comfortable space when facilitating dialogue between the community and police. Below are the seven tips and on Everyday Democracy’s site, you can find the full tip guidelines with examples. Check out it on their site here. From Everyday Democracy… Having conversations about community-police relations can sometimes be uncomfortable. To help dialogue participants feel at ease, facilitators should come prepared to explain certain points at the beginning […] (continue)

Leading Great Meetings: How to Structure Yours For Success

The 230-page book, Leading Great Meetings: How to Structure Yours for Success, by Dr. Richard Lent was published June 2015. This book discusses how providing structure to meetings can help to create more productive meetings and offers 32 tools to conduct better meetings. More about the book… Recent advances in helping groups talk together to provide new ways to run effective meetings naturally…a structural approach. All meetings come with structures that affect how we behave in them. Structure includes how leaders frame a task, include different views, support […] (continue)

The Social Justice Phrase Guide

The Social Justice Phrase Guide is two-page guide created by Advancement Project, in collaboration with The Opportunity Agenda. This guide puts forth five guidelines for conscientious communication, that give examples of alternative phrases and metaphors to replace out-dated ones that are offensive and/or discriminatory. View the guide below or download it here. From Advancement Project… Advancing a social justice agenda starts with being smart and deliberate in how we frame our discourse. The Social Justice Phrase Guide is your go-to tool to craft inclusive messages. Whether developing […] (continue)

Searching for Wise Questions

The article, Searching for Wise Questions, by Laura Chasin was published September 2011 and discusses how the way questions are framed can dramatically shape the answer. Written with the September 11, 2001 attacks in mind, the article offers opportunities to frame questions in a way that heal rather than divide. Below is an excerpt from the article and the full piece can be found on Public Conversations Project’s website here. From the article… My experience conducting dialogues among those who have fierce differences about issues such as abortion […] (continue)

10 Tips for Better Attendance at Engagement Events

The article from Everyday Democracy, Where Did All The People Go? One Reason You’re Getting a Low Turnout at Community Engagement Events and 10 Things You Can Do About It, by Rebecca Reyes was published August 11, 2015. In the article, it talks about the challenges of getting people to attend public engagement events and provides 10 tips for how to improve attendance. Below is the full article and the link to the original article on Everyday Democracy’s site is here. Read the full article below… If […] (continue)

Designing Digital Democracy: A Short Guide

This May 2015 blog article, Designing digital democracy: a short guide, by Geoff Mulgan of Nesta, provides a guide to designing public participation processes. Mulgan gives several points of clarity to consider when designing a process, like: what is the purpose of the engagement, who is trying to be reached, what are appropriate tools [digital and/or F2F], the scale of the effort and taking into considerations the desire for anonymity. Below is the full article and the link to the original piece can be found here. Read […] (continue)

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