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Reports & Articles…

Reports and articles on dialogue, deliberation, public engagement and conflict resolution.

Tackling Wicked Problems Collaboratively: The Multicentric IBIS

This Prezi Presentation is about MctIBIS, a web based system for tackling wicked problems collaboratively. MctIBIS is based on the Issue-Based Information System (IBIS) introduced by Horst Rittel in the 70s and implemented using an information relationship management engine. (continue)

Inviting Dialogue: Renewing the Deep Purposes of Higher Education

Clark University’s Higgins School of Humanities published a document in 2011 called “Inviting Dialogue: Renewing the Deep Purposes of Higher Education,” which recounts the growth of the Difficult Dialogues project at Clark, and offers a number of resources for further exploration of the work of dialogue. With stories from students, faculty, and administrators, this serves as a multi-layered inspritation for how dialogue might serve any college campus. From the intro… The work of the Difficult Dialogues initiative at Clark began when we responded to the […] (continue)

The Program on Intergroup Relations Publications

At the heart of the Program on Intergroup Relations (University of Michigan's Ann Arbor campus) website is a comprehensive list of publications, reports and research documents, many online, relating to Intergroup Dialogue and Intergroup Relations Education. (continue)

Virtual Meetings: Design with the ‘Distracted Participant’ in Mind

Here is a wonderful summary by Geoffrey Morton-Haworth of a January 2011 discussion in NCDD’s LinkedIn group on ground rules and best practices in virtual facilitation.  The discussion was started by group member Martin Pearson with the subject “Groundrules necessary to make the best of virtual meetings,” and is also posted on Geoffrey’s yalaworld.net site at this link. Martin wrote that he was starting to use Skype more for meetings, and asked group members if they have created specific ground rules for their own virtual […] (continue)

Inclusive community in a diverse world: Pursuing an elusive goal through narrative-based dialogue

How can we create spaces for building relationships where people restore integrity and justice and create sustainable communities in the century ahead? This 2001 article by Boyd Rossing and Michelle Glowacki-Dudka in the Journal of Community Psychology (Volume 29, Issue 6, pages 729–743) explores the theoretical aspects of using narrative and dialogue in the process of community building and presents the results of a local experiment. Findings demonstrate the viability of this model, while experience in planning and conducting these dialogues reveals forces that emerge to shape […] (continue)

Breaking barriers, crossing boundaries, building bridges: Communication processes in intergroup dialogues

Ratnesh Nagda’s 2006 article titled “Breaking barriers, crossing boundaries, building bridges: Communication processes in intergroup dialogues” was published in the Journal of Social Issues, 62(3), 553-576. Ratnesh shared the following text about the article and some related resources in an NCDD listserv discussion about assessment in October 2010: The communication processes conceptualizes the dialogic nature of encounter within the context of differences and inequalities. I found four interrelated processes: appreciating difference, engaging self, critical reflection and alliance building. My colleagues and I are now using […] (continue)

Using Social Media to Increase Civic Engagement in U.S. Federal Agencies

Published in March 2010 and available for download from SlideShare, the 90-ish page Using Social Media to Increase Civic Engagement in U.S. Federal Agencies is a report for the FCC’s Broadband Taskforce, Civic Engagement Team. Archon Fung was the academic advisor for this paper, which was prepared by two Kennedy School grad students. http://www.slideshare.net/yasminfodil/social-media-and-civic-participation-final Here is the executive summary: Civic engagement is a critical element of our democratic process. It has many potential benefits for public policy professionals, including: creating public value in the form […] (continue)

Legislation Supporting Citizen Participation

Three resources to help you get a sense of the kinds of legislation that can and do support citizen engagement in governance and decision-making, an NCDD listserv compilation, an amazing article by Lisa Bingham, and a 2003 global compilation by LogoLink. (continue)

Deliberative Democracy or Discursively Biased? Perth’s Dialogue with the City Initiative

The State Government in Western Australia has portrayed itself as a champion of revitalising local democracy and civic engagement. This can be seen in the plethora of community consultation/participation policy documents that have emerged from the Premier's Citizens and Civics Unit over the past five years. Dialogue with the City, a major participatory planning process that formed part of the development of a new strategic plan—Network City—for metropolitan Perth, has been heralded as an exemplar of deliberative democracy. This paper draws on deliberative democratic theory, performative policy analysis and institutional discourse analysis to interrogate the efficacy of this claim by examining the discursive practices leading up to and including the Community Forum, a major consultative and participatory event of the Dialogue Initiative. (continue)

An Evolving Relationship: Executive Branch Approaches to Civic Engagement and Philanthropy

Philanthropy for Active Civic Engagement (PACE) released its 8-page white paper “An Evolving Relationship: Executive Branch Approaches to Civic Engagement and Philanthropy” in May 2010. This white paper is based on a briefing memo prepared for a White House meeting earlier in 2010 between leaders of the philanthropic community and Executive Branch officials. The meeting focused on the topics of service, civic engagement, social innovation and public participation and where there might be shared interests between the two groups. (continue)