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List of Posts with Specific TagsTag Archives: international

News from outside the U.S.

New CPRN Papers Show that Arts and Culture are the Keys to Creative Cities

Our friends at CPRN (Canadian Policy Research Networks) just released four new papers that underline the key role of the arts and culture in the creation of “creative cities,” especially in today’s knowledge economy. According to CPRN, “Creative cities are vital to meeting our community and national economic and social goals. By happy coincidence, the conditions that foster creative cities also foster economic innovation, social inclusion, democratic engagement and environmental sustainability.”… (continue)

220 Israeli and Palestinian Educators Are Preparing a Revolution in the Education System

Leah Green of the Compassionate Listening Project forwarded this July 23 message to her Reconciliation List, and I thought I’d share it with you folks. The message begins… In a demonstration of strength in the belief that “there is someone on the other side to talk to” more than 220 teachers and educators from Israel and from Palestine met this past week for an encounter and teacher training seminar. These teachers are taking part in the Peace Education Program of IPCRI – the Israel/Palestine Center […] (continue)

Update on Jewish/Islam/Christian Dialogue from the Israeli-Based Interfaith Encounter Association

I don’t usually post these announcements to the blog, but I thought this one would provide a good example of the kinds of updates you can receive from the Interfaith Encounter Association. If your work is related to Jewish/Palestian dialogue, you may want to subscribe to this announcement list by emailing iea-reports-subscribe@yahoogroups.com. (continue)

Update on British Columbia's Citizens' Assembly

The final Citizens’ Assembly public hearing was held June 24th in Kelowna, British Columbia (Canada). During the 50 hearings that have been held across B.C., a total of 387 people made oral presentations, and many more members of the public made informal presentations, offered recommendations and comments, and asked questions at the sessions. More than 2,700 members of the public attended hearings. The 160-member Assembly is currently wrapping up six months dedicated to investigating electoral options and British Columbians’ views on them, and will make […] (continue)

CIVICUS Produces Report on New Approaches to Global Problem-Solving

I saw this announcement in Friday’s newsletter from CIVICUS: World Alliance for Citizen Participation: CIVICUS, as part of a group of civil society, research, corporate sector and various levels of international government representatives, is finalizing a report for the Helsinki Process on Globalization and Democracy on new approaches to global problem-solving. This Process, initiated by the Finnish Government in cooperation with the government of Tanzania, aims to develop innovative solutions to the dilemmas of global governance, especially where they affect the most vulnerable sections of […] (continue)

Quotas, Fines and Yes-No Votes: An Update on British Columbia's Citizens' Assembly

I just received a press release from the groundbreaking Citizens’ Assembly on Electoral Reform. The Assembly is an independent, representative, non-partisan group of 160 randomly selected British Columbians. They must decide by December 15 whether to propose a change to BC’s electoral system. If they recommend a change, it will be the subject of a referendum for all voters in the May 2005 provincial election. Click below to read the entire press release about last week’s public hearings in Port McNeill, Courtenay, Nanaimo and Vancouver. (continue)

Update from Citizens' Assembly on Electoral Reform

I received an email today from Paul Harris of British Columbia’s groundbreaking Citizens’ Assembly on Electoral Reform. The Assembly is an independent, representative, non-partisan group of 160 randomly-selected British Columbians. They must decide by December 15 whether to propose a change to B.C.’s electoral system. If they recommend a change, it will be the subject of a referendum for all voters in the May 2005 provincial election. Click below for an overview of this week’s public hearings. (continue)

Canadian Citizens' Assembly Breaking New Ground

In case you haven’t heard about the British Columbia Parliament’s innovative experiment in deliberative democracy called “Citizens’ Assembly on Electoral Reform,” I thought I’d post an update. Formed last year by that province’s government to get meanngful citizen input into reforming its entire electoral system, the Citizens Assembly has been holding hearings for months now. As it says on the Citizens’ Assembly website, “nowhere else in the world has such power been handed to randomly selected citizens. Click below to read more, or go to […] (continue)

An Inspirational Report on National Issues Forums Held in Russia

I receive “Friday Letters” each week from the Kettering Foundation. The April 16th Friday Letter started off with an inspirational report from KF Associate Phil Stewart about his recent trip to Russia. Phil and his colleagues observed several deliberative forums, and noticed a clear commitment to learning and practicing the norms of democratic deliberation. One elderly teacher is quoted as saying “Only if my grandchildren learn to think critically, think for themselves and to deliberate in public, only then will they have the opportunity to […] (continue)

Report Emphasizes Need for Public Involvement in World's Water Problems

Pat Bonner of the EPA forwarded this interesting press release to me the other day. On World Water Day 2004, a new report was released from the Geneva-based Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council WSSCC. The report emphasized that the world’s severe water and sanitation problems will not be solved by “business as usual” – delivering solutions from the outside to communities who have had no involvement in, or ownership of, the process. An important report in its implications for public involvement. Click below for […] (continue)

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