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List of Posts with Specific TagsTag Archives: research

New research or academic articles of note to the D&D community.

Register for Frontiers of Democracy 2015, June 25-27!

It’s time to start gearing up again for this year’s Frontiers of Democracy conference in Boston, MA this June 25th-27th! This anual conference has become a key civic infrastructure where leaders in the D&D field and democratic thought to gather to explore ideas at the forefront of advancing democracy, and we highly recommend you join us there! Frontiers of Democracy is sponsored by Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service at Tufts University, the Democracy Imperative, and the Deliberative Democracy Consortium, all of which have NCDD members in their leadership. The organizers describe the […] (continue)

New Research on Public Engagement Practitioners

This blog post was submitted by NCDD supporting member Caroline W. Lee, associate professor of Sociology at Lafayette College and author of Do-It-Yourself Democracy: The Rise of the Public Engagement Industry… There has been a recent explosion of research interest in public engagement practitioners, much of which uses qualitative research methods and ethnography to capture the rich practices and processes in the field (see, for example, Oliver Escobar’s work here). In this vein, I wanted to share with readers of the blog about a symposium on […] (continue)

Experiment Shows Public Engagement Can Increase Tax Revenues

As public engagement practitioners, many of us have talked with public officials who want to know how engagement will improve a municipality’s bottom line. That’s why we appreciated NCDD member Tiago Peixoto‘s recent blog post on the first experimental – not just observational – evidence that our work can help cities collect more taxes. We encourage you to read Tiago’s post below or find the original here. You can find the paper on the experiment by clicking here. There are caveats in the findings, but we hope this new […] (continue)

How Can Deliberation in Citizens’ Juries Improve?

We wanted to share another great thought piece from Max Hardy of Max Hardy Consulting, an NCDD organizational member – this time on the ways Citizens’ Juries can be improved. Max’s reflections are based in the Australian context, but plenty of them can apply to these deliberative bodies elsewhere. We encourage you to read his piece below or find the original on his blog by clicking here. Reflections on the growing trend of using Citizens’ Juries in Australia (and how we might make them even more […] (continue)

Evaluativism 101

We are happy to share the announcement below from NCDD Member Chris Santos-Lang of GRIN Free. Chris’s announcement came via our great Submit-to-Blog Form. Do you have news you want to share with the NCDD network? Just click here to submit your news post for the NCDD Blog! What Is Evaluativism? The word “homophobia” was coined in the 1960s to name something that had been occurring for centuries before being named. The word “evaluativism” is an even more recently coined term with an even older history. Much as “racism” and “sexism” refer […] (continue)

Register for Public Lands Seminar in Yellowstone

We want to make sure that our higher ed NCDDers know that there are a few more spaces left for a great program on dealing with public issues being held in beautiful Yellowstone National Park this July 27 – August 1. The program is hosted for higher ed professionals by the AASCU. We’ve shared the NIFI announcement about the program below, and you can learn more from the program page here. How does a democracy manage competing but often equally legitimate positions over public resources? How are the […] (continue)

On Evaluation and Legitimacy in D&D

Our partners at the Kettering Foundation recently published an insightful interview with Prof. Katie Knobloch of the Center for Public Deliberation – an NCDD organizational member – that we wanted to share here. There’s a lot to learn from Katie’s reflection on the challenges of evaluating and legitimizing D&D work, so we encourage you to read the interview below or find the original piece here. Does Our Work Really Matter? Deliberative Practitioners Reflect on the Impact of Their Work As attention to public deliberation has increased, one core interest of […] (continue)

Apply to the Summer Institute of Civic Studies by Mar. 15

We encourage NCDD members to apply to be part of the 7th annual Summer Institute of Civic Studies this June 15-25, and also to consider attending the 2015 Frontiers of Democracy conference this June 24-25. Both events have institutions in the field that are stewarded by NCDD supporting members Drs. Peter Levine and Nancy Thomas of Tufts University. I myself am a Summer Institute alumni and have attended multiple Frontiers conferences, and they are both great opportunities to learn and work with many of the nation’s leaders of civic innovation. Find out more below about both  in the […] (continue)

NCDD Member Orgs Form New PB Research Board

In case you missed it, the Participatory Budgeting Project and Public Agenda – two key NCDD organizational members – announced last fall that they have formed the first North American research board to study the participatory budgeting process. Not only is this an important and exciting development for the field, but we are proud to count two NCDD members – Matt Leighninger and Paolo Spada – among the new board. Read the announcement below or find the original version here. PBP and Public Agenda are facilitating the […] (continue)

IF Offers Discussion Guide on Climate Change

The next round of UN climate talks began this week in Lima, Peru, and as global leaders debate how to avert the worst effects of climate change, our communities also need to be having conversations about this pressing topic. We learned from our members at the 2014 National Conference on Dialogue & Deliberation that D&D practitioners want more resources that will help them have real and productive conversations on this difficult topic. Lucky for us, the Interactivity Foundation (or IF) – one of the wonderful sponsors of our conference – […] (continue)

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