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List of Posts with Specific TagsTag Archives: research

New research or academic articles of note to the D&D community.

New Research on Inclusive Engagement & Technology

We are cross-posting an interesting study that we found on NCDD member Tiago Peixoto‘s blog, DemocracySpot. The post details some of the findings from a recent study on the effect of technology on public participation in Brazil. You can check it out below or find his post here. Unusual Suspects? Effects of Technology on Citizen Engagement (Originally posted on the World Bank’s Let’s Talk Development blog) What is the effect of technology on citizen engagement? On the one hand, enthusiasts praise the prospects offered by technology: from real-time beneficiary feedback to collaborative […] (continue)

Can Participatory Budgeting Democratize School Budgets?

We encourage you to check out what promises to be a fascinating webinar that the Participatory Budgeting Project, an NCDD member organization, is hosting on Thursday, June 4th from 2-3pm EST / 11am-12pm PST.  The webinar is titled “Democratizing Schools with Participatory Budgeting” and will be an in-depth discussion of the nation’s first school-based participatory budgeting (PB) processes, featuring representatives from PB projects at schools in San Jose, CA and Chicago, IL. The webinar will seek to use insights from these cases studies to explore the impact that democratic processes like PB can have on young people, […] (continue)

Newest Issue of the Journal of Public Deliberation

We want to encourage our members to take a look at the newest issue of the Journal of Public Deliberation, which is not just a great resource for our field, but also features the work of some of our great NCDD members. The JPD itself is a joint effort between two NCDD organizations – the Deliberative Democracy Consortium and the International Association of Public Participation. You can find the list of articles in this issue below with links to their abstracts and full PDF downloads. We encourage you to learn more […] (continue)

Up to 65% Off on EvDem Resources til May 15!

We encourage NCDD members to take advantage of a great sale on discussion resources that Everyday Democracy – an NCDD organizational member – is having before they move to a new office space. Check out the announcement of the sale and the move below, or find the original here. We’re downsizing our office space, and we can’t take everything with us! Now through May 15, some of our most popular discussion guides are up to 65% off: Facing Racism in a Diverse Nation (English) Thriving Communities […] (continue)

All-Expenses Trip to Train on NIFI’s Online Deliberation Tool

We want our members to know that the Kettering Foundation and National Issues Forums Institute are offering an amazing opportunity for NIF moderators to attend an in-person training on their new online deliberation tool, Common Ground for Action, this May 18-19 in Ohio. Kettering is generously offering to foot the while bill, but you must register by April 29! Read more below or find the original announcement here. “We need some way to be able to take National Issues Forums online.” NIF moderators and conveners have been telling […] (continue)

Register for Frontiers of Democracy 2015, June 25-27!

It’s time to start gearing up again for this year’s Frontiers of Democracy conference in Boston, MA this June 25th-27th! This anual conference has become a key civic infrastructure where leaders in the D&D field and democratic thought to gather to explore ideas at the forefront of advancing democracy, and we highly recommend you join us there! Frontiers of Democracy is sponsored by Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service at Tufts University, the Democracy Imperative, and the Deliberative Democracy Consortium, all of which have NCDD members in their leadership. The organizers describe the […] (continue)

New Research on Public Engagement Practitioners

This blog post was submitted by NCDD supporting member Caroline W. Lee, associate professor of Sociology at Lafayette College and author of Do-It-Yourself Democracy: The Rise of the Public Engagement Industry… There has been a recent explosion of research interest in public engagement practitioners, much of which uses qualitative research methods and ethnography to capture the rich practices and processes in the field (see, for example, Oliver Escobar’s work here). In this vein, I wanted to share with readers of the blog about a symposium on […] (continue)

Experiment Shows Public Engagement Can Increase Tax Revenues

As public engagement practitioners, many of us have talked with public officials who want to know how engagement will improve a municipality’s bottom line. That’s why we appreciated NCDD member Tiago Peixoto‘s recent blog post on the first experimental – not just observational – evidence that our work can help cities collect more taxes. We encourage you to read Tiago’s post below or find the original here. You can find the paper on the experiment by clicking here. There are caveats in the findings, but we hope this new […] (continue)

How Can Deliberation in Citizens’ Juries Improve?

We wanted to share another great thought piece from Max Hardy of Max Hardy Consulting, an NCDD organizational member – this time on the ways Citizens’ Juries can be improved. Max’s reflections are based in the Australian context, but plenty of them can apply to these deliberative bodies elsewhere. We encourage you to read his piece below or find the original on his blog by clicking here. Reflections on the growing trend of using Citizens’ Juries in Australia (and how we might make them even more […] (continue)

Evaluativism 101

We are happy to share the announcement below from NCDD Member Chris Santos-Lang of GRIN Free. Chris’s announcement came via our great Submit-to-Blog Form. Do you have news you want to share with the NCDD network? Just click here to submit your news post for the NCDD Blog! What Is Evaluativism? The word “homophobia” was coined in the 1960s to name something that had been occurring for centuries before being named. The word “evaluativism” is an even more recently coined term with an even older history. Much as “racism” and “sexism” refer […] (continue)

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