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List of Posts with Specific TagsTag Archives: research

New research or academic articles of note to the D&D community.

Surprising Results in Online Commenting Study

NCDD has been part of an ongoing conversation about whether online comment sections can be spaces for dialogue and if there are methods or tools we can use to make those spaces more civil. One of our NCDD organizational members, the National Institute for Civil Discourse, recently released on a study on the topic that has some surprising, though not exactly encouraging, results. You can read NICD’s announcement about the study below or find the original here. A new study confirms that incivility is common on online news websites. Researchers at the University of Utah and the University of Arizona analyzed […] (continue)

New Study Finds Surprising Lack of Red-Blue Divide

We want to share the announcement on an insightful new study that we know will interest NCDD members that comes from NCDD supporting member Steven Kull of Voice of the People. VOP teamed up with the Program for Public Consultation to conduct a study on public policy opinions that has some pretty surprising results. You can learn more about the study in Steven’s announcement below or find the study by clicking here. A new study conducted by NCDD members at Voice of the People and the Program for […] (continue)

New Issue Guide on Economy Choices from NIFI

We wanted to make sure the NCDD members heard that our organizational partners at the National Issues Forums Institute have published their latest issue guide for deliberative conversations. Released earlier this month, the newest guide is called The Future of Work: How Should We Prepare for the New Economy? The guide is designed to walk participants through tough choices about what policy directions we should take in dealing with the broader national economy. The following excerpt can help you get a better sense of the approach the guide is taking: The nature of the work […] (continue)

Looking Closer at “Mixed Results” in Civic Participation

One our ever-insightful NCDD members, Tiago Peixoto, shared a summary of some important civic participation research that shows that “mixed results” of participation efforts say more when we delineate between “tactical” or “strategic” interventions. We’ve shared Tiago’s piece from his DemocracySpot blog below, and you can find the original here. Social Accountability: What Does the Evidence Really Say? So what does the evidence about citizen engagement say? Particularly in the development world it is common to say that the evidence is “mixed”. It is the type of […] (continue)

JPD Special Issue Looks at “The State of Our Field”

This month, the Deliberative Democracy Consortium (DDC) and the International Association for Public Participation (IAP2) released a special issue of their collaboratively produced Journal of Public Deliberation, and it is a must-read.  They collected writings from leading scholars and practitioners of our work – including numerous NCDD members and our director, Sandy Heierbacher – to create this special issue focused on “The State of Our Field”: This is a special issue that assess the state of our field, celebrates our successes, and calls for future innovative work. The […] (continue)

Let’s Discuss: How Politics Makes Us Stupid

There is a fascinating article up at Vox.com that I encourage all NCDD members and subscribers to our Transpartisan Listserv to give some thought to. My friend Jean Johnson at Public Agenda, one of NCDD’s organizational members, alerted me to it last week, and it ties directly into conversations that are going on in both the NCDD Discussion list and the Transpartisan list. The article by Ezra Klein, How Politics Makes Us Stupid, talks about research that shows that a more informed public has little effect on politics, polarization, […] (continue)

A Glimmer of Hope in Pew’s Polarization Report

The Pew Research Center recently released a report on polarization in the US that has important insights for our field. The report is huge, but luckily, NCDD Board of Directors member John Backman created a wonderful overview of the report’s findings, with an eye toward what it means for our work. We highly encourage you to read John’s thoughts below and add your reflections on the Pew study in the comments section.  How Far Apart Are We, Really? A Closer Look at Pew’s Polarization Report by John Backman The […] (continue)

New Reports on Civic Dialogue & Business Leaders

Our friends at the Network for Business Sustainability recently released two reports that we think NCDD members should note. The reports focus on the potential for business leaders to be more involved in civic dialogues, and we encourage you to read more about them in the NBS statement below. Businesses have traditionally played little role in civic dialogue, but their involvement can help advance issues. The Network for Business Sustainability (NBS) has recently published two reports, written by Dr. Thomas Webler, that identify the potential for […] (continue)

Chronicle of Philanthropy Highlights PACE Project

We just heard from our friends with Philanthropy for Active Civic Engagement (PACE) that their work with was featured recently in the prominent Chronicle of Philanthropy. The article was coauthored by two NCDD members and has some great insights, so we wanted to share their announcement and encourage you to read the article. You can read their announcement below. The Chronicle of Philanthropy has recently published “Foundations Must Rethink Their Ideas of Strategic Giving and Accountability”, an article that was co-authored by PACE Executive Director Chris Gates […] (continue)

KF Interviews Imagining America Codirector

We recently read a fascinating interview with Imagining America codirector Timothy Eatman that our organizational partners at the Kettering Foundation published that we want NCDD members to see. IA’s work in bridging academia and public engagement is critical to advancing our field, so we encourage you to read Timothy’s thoughts on how we get there below. You can find the original interview here. In a recent column in the New York Times, Nicholas Kristof laments that scholars are too often unimportant and “irrelevant,” producing “gobbledygook . . . hidden in obscure […] (continue)

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