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Request for Proposals — ACR-EPP Conference in May

Association for Conflict Resolution

NCDD member, John Stephens, recently sent us some information to share with our readers about the upcoming Association for Conflict Resolution — Environment and Public Policy Section Conference being held on Monday, May 19th and their request for workshop proposals. Focusing on “Nurturing Conflict Resolution Skills, Practices, and Programs amid Institutional Changes“, this year’s event is seeking proposals from section members and others who would like to participate as presenters. John is available to answer questions about the conference and this call for proposals. His contact info can be found at the end of the RFP.

The full Request for Proposals follows the break.

REQUESTS FOR PROPOSALS — DUE FRIDAY – FEBRUARY 22, 2008 
Nurturing Conflict Resolution Skills, Practices, and Programs amid Institutional Changes
May 19, 2008
Tucson, AZ
Environment and Public Policy Section, Association for Conflict Resolution
http://www.mediate.com/acrepp/ 
 
The Environment and Public Policy Section (EPP) of the Association for Conflict Resolution welcomes proposals from section members and others who would like to participate as presenters in the 2008 EPP Section Conference.
 
DESCRIPTION OF THEMES

By holding the conference in collaboration with the United States Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution (USIECR, May 20-22), we hope to draw on the extensive experience of collaborative leaders from government agencies as well as  environmental and public policy practitioners who partner with different institutions. The EPP conference is at the same location as the USIECR conference, the Doubletree Tucson Reid Park in Tucson.

We are seeking proposals that address the following questions:

Political Leadership Change

a) Political leadership changes at the local, state, and federal levels present opportunities and challenges. How have practitioners and programs responded to these changes?
b) What are participants’ experiences with making collaboration and consensus building “stick” through changes in political leadership?
c) How do you sustain and embed collaboration and consensus building through transitions?

Organizational Changes

a) How do changes in institutional missions, goals, and roles affect our work? What are the experiences and learnings from changes in schools, universities, corporations, foundations, and other institutions?
b) Do practitioners use theories, process frameworks, skills, and tools from organizational development in the EPP field? For example, how are EPP practitioners using coaching, dispute system design, and professional development-training mechanisms in our work? Do we have successful cases from which to learn?
c) How does the collaboration and consensus-building field interact with the organizational development field? Are there educational programs, institutional programs, or cases that demonstrate promising partnerships?

Societal Changes

a) How does the greater understanding of collaboration and consensus building in many segments of society combined with a wider range of providers and services affect the creativity, institutionalization, and continuity of our work?
b) With changes in institutions and society, are we changing the goals of environmental and public policy practice? Do we describe our work differently? And if so, do those differences have any ethical impacts?
c) How do new technologies of participation affect our goals and practices?

 Resource Changes

a) With a changing economy and increasing devolution of responsibility, to many local- and state-level government agencies, how do these agencies view their role in planning and problem solving? How do those changes affect the partnerships, scope of our work, and outcomes?
b) How do state and federal governmental programs sustain their impact through resources changes?
c) How have collaborative leaders and EPP practitioners partnered with organizations to overcome resource constraints and challenges?

 OPPORTUNITIES TO PARTICIPATE

 We are seeking three kinds of proposals:

1. Presenting a concurrent session,
2. Organizing networking, and
3. Offering “short snacks” – brief presentations on topics of interest.

Concurrent Sessions

We invite proposals for 30-, 60-, or 90-minute concurrent sessions.  Concurrent sessions can address one of the themes or some other topic of general interest to our profession.  Please format your proposal using the following categories so we can easily evaluate and compare proposals. We encourage both individuals and collaborative groups to submit proposals. Please limit your initial proposals to one page.  Planning Committee members will contact you to explore your ideas in greater detail in the event your proposal is selected for further consideration.

•  Contact Information: Name, Title, Email, Phone(s), Mailing Address
•  Theme you wish to focus on: Indicate whether your proposal relates to the themes of political, institutional, societal or resource changes or another topic of your choice.
•  Who: Identify all individuals who are contributing to your proposal and indicate their roles (panelist, moderator, co-leader, etc.).  Please also note the presenters’ experience in presenting at professional conferences.
•  What: What do you propose to present? What question(s) will you be trying to answer?
•  Why: Please describe, briefly, why you propose offering this session, and why you think conference attendees would be interested in participating in it.
•  How: Do you want to do a presentation, organize a panel, facilitate a round table discussion, have the group break into smaller groups, do a simulation, etc? Describe what the session will look and feel like.
 Criteria for Evaluation of Concurrent Session Proposals
•  Potential to add significant value to conference participants’ experience (i.e. uniqueness, substantively compelling, extremely useful/practical, etc.)
•  Likelihood that the session will be interactive and promote a discourse that goes beyond discussion of individual cases
•  Extent to which the proposal provides linkages between the organizing questions within a given theme or between themes
Networking
We would like the conference to provide an opportunity for deliberate, engaging networking.  We invite proposals for encouraging this activity in a structured way during an extended lunch period.  Please provide at least the information outlined below. The information may be provided in narrative form if preferred.  If your idea is selected, we will ask you to assist with organizing the networking at the conference. 
•  Contact Information: Name, Title, Email, Phone(s), Mailing Address
•  Organizing principle(s): Would your proposal have participants connect on the basis of common topics of interest, types of practice, geographical location, or on the basis of some other principle?
•  Mechanics:  How would participants identify and meet with others?
•  Activities during networking:  Does your proposal what participants will do during the networking period.
•  Support needed:  Would your proposal require rooms, tables, facilitators or other support to function effectively?

“Short Snacks”

The conference will feature one or more concurrent sessions comprised of “short snacks” – brief (twenty-minute, approximately) accounts of experiences, tools, approaches, or anything else that may be of interest to practitioners and users of collaborative processes.  The intention is to provide an opportunity for the presentation of topics that may not warrant an entire concurrent session, but that are nevertheless interesting and valuable. Planning Committee members may contact you to explore your idea in greater detail in the event your proposal is selected for further consideration.

• Contact Information: Name, Title, Email, Phone(s)
•  Topic or Theme you wish to focus on: Indicate whether your proposal relates to the themes of political, institutional, societal or resources changes or another topic of your choice.
•  Who: Identify presenter(s) and experience in presenting at professional conferences.
•  What: What do you propose to present?
•  Why: Please describe, briefly, why you think conference attendees would be interested in this  “snack”
•  How: Describe what the session will look and feel like.
 
Criteria for Evaluation of “Short Snack” Proposals

•  Potential to add significant value to conference participants’ experience (i.e. uniqueness, substantively compelling, extremely useful/practical, etc.)
•  Extent to which the proposal provides linkages between the organizing questions within a given theme or between themes
Schedule
•  Deadline for submission: February 22
•  Committee review period: February 22-March 3
•  Notice to proposals selected for further consideration: March 4

Submit proposals to:

John Stephens 
stephens@sog.unc.edu
(919) 962-2705 – fax
(919) 962-5190 – voice

Andy Fluke
Andy Fluke is the co-founder of NCDD and currently provides creative support to many of NCDD's publications and events. He also works with a handful of other NCDD members on a variety of projects as consultant and designer. More about his work can be found at www.andyfluke.com.

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