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Posts with the Tag “dialogue fodder”

Encounter Point

Encounter Point is an 85-minute feature documentary film that follows a former Israeli settler, a Palestinian ex-prisoner, a bereaved Israeli mother and a wounded Palestinian bereaved brother who risk their lives and public standing to promote a nonviolent end to the conflict. Their journeys lead them to the unlikeliest places to confront hatred within their communities. The film explores what drives them and thousands of other like-minded civilians to overcome anger and grief to work for grassroots solutions. It is a film about the everyday leaders in our midst. (continue)

Struggling to be Heard: The Unmet Needs of Asian Pacific American Children

The social, psychological, and educational needs of Asian Pacific American youth often go unmet. This book, written by multicultural educators, social workers, psychologists, and others, challenges stereotypical beliefs and seeks to provide, basic knowledge and direction for working with this population, often labeled as 'the model minority.' (continue)

The Color of Fear 3

The Color of Fear 3 is an intimate conversation on the issues of what it is to be gay in this society and the impact it has on their sense of safety and identity. Through their personal stories and interactions, we have a glimpse into the fears, the stereotypes, and moral issues that are dividing and confronting us today. (continue)

NCDD Commentary: Declaring & Celebrating Our Interdependence

Sandy Heierbacher added this commentary to the NCDD website on July 1, 2003. The commentary is based largely on material written primarily by Tom Atlee that Sandy wanted to share with the NCDD community. This commentary outlines the various "Interdependence Days" and "Declarations of Interdependence" that different organizations are spearheading on July 4 and other days. (continue)

The Letter: An American Town and the ‘Somali Invasion’

This 76-minute documentary film tells the story of 1,100 Somalian immigrants who relocated to Lewiston, Maine. At first the immigrants were welcomed, but soon fear and distrust broke out amongst the townspeople. Tensions erupted after the mayor sent a letter to the immigrants requesting that they tell their friends and family not to move into the town. The mayor claimed that the newcomers were straining town services. The conflict escalated into competing 'hate' and 'peace' rallies held simultaneously and separated by only a few miles. "The Letter" could help dialogue programs raise awareness in their communities about how racism and immigration intersect. The film could also help planners decide which of these issues to address in their community. (continue)

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