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Posts with the Tag “research”

PRIA – An International Centre for Learning and Promotion of Participation and Democratic Governance

PRIA's founders believed in two principles of development: Participatory Research, which believes in the intrinsic value of people's knowledge as basis for their own empowerment, and Participatory Development, a process which empowers people to create and implement their own development plans. In the process of its work at the grassroots, PRIA pioneered a vast range of methodologies and tools for the empowerment of the marginalized, including Participatory Training, Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation, Multi-Stakeholder Dialogue, and Community Based Monitoring. (continue)

Inclusive community in a diverse world: Pursuing an elusive goal through narrative-based dialogue

How can we create spaces for building relationships where people restore integrity and justice and create sustainable communities in the century ahead? This 2001 article by Boyd Rossing and Michelle Glowacki-Dudka in the Journal of Community Psychology (Volume 29, Issue 6, pages 729–743) explores the theoretical aspects of using narrative and dialogue in the process of community building and presents the results of a local experiment. Findings demonstrate the viability of this model, while experience in planning and conducting these dialogues reveals forces that emerge to shape […] (continue)

A Ladder of Citizen Participation

Sherry Arnstein, writing in 1969 about citizen involvement in planning processes in the United States, described a “ladder of citizen participation.” The ladder of citizen participation ranges from high citizen power to low (as pictured). See Sherry R. Arnstein’s “A Ladder of Citizen Participation,” Journal of the American Planning Association, Vol. 35, No. 4, July 1969, pp. 216-224. Available online here. This article is about power structures in society and how they interact. Specifically it is a guide to seeing who has power when important […] (continue)

New Social Inquiry journal

New Social Inquiry is an academic journal that publishes social research essays and relative works that are accessible to a wide audience, engaging and relevant for non-specialists, yet sophisticated and complex enough to push scholarship forward. Their first publication will focus on public dialogue. Here’s an excerpt from the guidelines for submission: Is there such a thing as public dialogue, now or in the past? If so, who participates, who leads, and what forms does it take? If not, how can it realistically be realized? […] (continue)

Democracy as Discussion: Civic Education and the American Forum Movement

Using primary sources from archives around the country, William M. Keith’s book Democracy as Discussion traces the early history of the Speech field, the development of discussion as an alternative to debate, and the Deweyan, Progressive philosophy of discussion that swept the United States in the early twentieth century. Available at Amazon.com. (continue)

Understanding Participation: A Literature Review

The 50-page Understanding Participation: A Literature Review review brings together different bodies of literature on participation, including literature on community development, volunteering, public participation, social movements, everyday politics and ethical consumption. It looks at the historical and current drivers of participation, the activities and actors of participation and different theoretical approaches that contribute to a better understanding of participation. It closes with our emerging ‘participation framework’ that we aim to further develop and refine in the subsequent stages of the project. This literature review forms […] (continue)

Who Wants to Deliberate – and Why?

Who Wants to Deliberate – and Why? is an article published as part of the Harvard Kennedy School’s Faculty Research Working Paper Series, co-authored by Michael Neblo, Kevin Esterling, Ryan Kennedy, David Lazer, and Anand Sokhey. It was published in the American Political Science Review Vol. 104, No. 3 (August 2010). This research suggests that willingness to participate in deliberative forms of political engagement is less tied to predictors like race, gender and income than willingness to participate in electoral politics. In the words of the […] (continue)

Neighbors Online report

The Pew Internet and American Life Project has released the Neighbors Online Report. The report shows that Americans use a range of approaches to keep informed about what is happening in their communities and online activities have been added to the mix. Face-to-face encounters and phone calls remain the most frequent methods of interaction with neighbors, while internet tools are gaining ground in community-oriented communications. More information can be found at Steven Clift‘s blog post on the report, titled Neighbors Online – What have 27% […] (continue)

2009 Dialogue and Deliberation Practitioners Survey results

Sociologists (and NCDD members) Caroline Lee and Francesca Polletta have created a website at http://sites.lafayette.edu/ddps to display the results of the 2009 Dialogue and Deliberation Practitioners Survey. You can also download the full survey results here. The survey was conducted online last Fall for the purpose of academic research on the deliberation field by the researchers. Francesca and Caroline felt that the field of public dialogue and deliberation has been growing so dramatically that no one fully knows what the field looks like. They sought […] (continue)

eJournal of eDemocracy and Open Government (JeDEM)

The eJournal of eDemocracy and Open Government (JeDEM) provides researchers and practitioners the opportunity to advance the practice and understanding of eDemocracy, eGovernment, eParticipation. The journal aims to bridge innovative, insightful and stimulating research, testing and findings with practice and the work conducted by governments, NPOs, NGOs and professionals. JeDEM is published by the Centre for E-Government at the Danube University Krems (Austria). (continue)

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