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Posts with the Tag “restorative justice”

Truth-telling, Reconciliation and Restorative Justice

Truth-telling, Reconciliation and Restorative Justice, is a course taught at Eastern Mennonite University’s Center for Justice and Peacebuilding. The course is part of the Summer Peacebuilding Institute, under Session IV,  and taught by Cal Stauffer and Fania Davis. To learn more about the rest of the courses offered at EMU’s Center for Justice and Peacebuilding, click here. From the description… The call for “truth-telling” has become paramount in the quest for justice. This course critically explores the linkages between truth and justice and grapples with the form […] (continue)

When Relationships Are Not Enough: Reconciling with Genocide

The article, When Relationships Are Not Enough: Reconciling with Genocide, by Dave Joseph was published September 21, 2015 on Public Conversations Project’s blog. In the article, Joseph reflects on his recent trip to Rwanda and the many intense and challenging emotions that arose when paying respects at the Kigali Genocide Memorial. The memorial honors those murdered in the 1994 genocide committed against the Tutsis and moderate Hutus. Joseph explores how such an extreme atrocity can happen and how this affects people to dialogue- what is […] (continue)

Restorative Justice for Oakland Youth [RJOY]

In 2005, Restorative Justice for Oakland Youth [RJOY] was co-created by Fania Davis and members of the Oakland community and government. RJOY works to implement programs within schools, the community and juvenile justice system; beginning with a pilot program at West Oakland middle school in 2007. In the places where restorative justice has been implemented, there has been a noticeable decrease in youth violence, crimes and recidivism; and an increase in victim satisfaction and reconciliation of affected parties. Restorative justice provides an alternative to our current […] (continue)

Transforming Historical Harms

The 96-page manual, Transforming Historical Harms by David Anderson Hooker and Amy Potter Czajkowski, was uploaded October 2013 on Coming to the Table‘s site. The manual gives a holistic framework to address historical injustices, in a way that engages all participants, and identifies the aftermath and legacies of [generational] trauma. This manual was developed by Coming to the Table and has been a collective effort of Eastern Mennonite University’s (EMU) Center for Justice & Peacebuilding (CJP) and their Strategies for Trauma Awareness and Resilience (STAR) program. From the […] (continue)

Re-imagining and Restoring Justice: Toward a Truth and Reconciliation Process to Address Violence Against African-Americans in the US

The webinar, Re-imagining and Restoring Justice: Toward a Truth and Reconciliation Process to Address Violence Against African-Americans in the US, was hosted by Carl Stauffer and speaker guest, Fania Davis, and occurred March 16, 2016 on Zehr Institute‘s site. In the hour and a half long webinar, Stauffer and Davis discuss the restorative-justice based, Truth and Reconciliation Movement. Davis begins with sharing her personal story and how her path led to restorative justice and the Truth and Reconciliation Movement. In this process, Davis explains, one asks the […] (continue)

Peacebuilders

Peacebuilders is a youth focused, not-for- profit, charitable organization based in Toronto, Canada. Peacebuilders was established to improve the lives of youth, by providing them with appropriate access to justice so that they are empowered to overcome personal challenges and are able to realize their full potential. The mission of Peacebuilders is to support youth and adults to manage conflict through Peacebuilding Circles. Peacebuilders programs not only help to keep young people in school and out of the criminal justice system, but also help to […] (continue)

Center for Restorative Practice

The purpose of the Center for Restorative Practice is to develop, implement and study collaborative and restorative processes for use by families, communities and organizations in the service of social justice. (continue)

Building a Home for the Heart: Using Metaphors in Value-Centered Circles

Discussing values is central to any restorative justice process, especially Circles. Based on years of experience as Circle keepers, Pat and Sue show how they use metaphors to facilitate the discussion of values and to move the dialogue in Circles to much deeper levels. (continue)

Community Conferencing as a Special Case of Conflict Transformation

McDonald and Moore seek to broaden the theory of transformative justice and conflict transformation. Specifically, they deal with community conferencing as the major reactive intervention based on a theory of conflict transformation in many settings: criminal justice, the workplace, education, and more. After summarizing the early theory on conferencing, with emphasis on the importance of the expression of shame in the process, the authors reexamine the notions of shame and guilt, particularly in relation to the sequence of a conference. (continue)

Restorative Justice and Civil Society

Advocates of restorative justice question the state's ability to deliver satisfactory justice. This provocative volume looks at the flourishing restorative justice movement and considers the relationship between restorative justice and civil society. Genuinely international, it addresses aspects of civil society including schools, families, churches and private workplaces and considers broader issues such as democracy, human rights, access and equity. It presents the ideals of restorative justice so that victims, offenders, their families and communities might have more representation in the justice process. (continue)

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